You’re Always One Person

Away from Referrals

Ep. 33 ft. Jessica Burgio

“Show up as the version you want people to remember you as.”

Jessica Burgio

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Bio
Jessica Burgio, known as “THE BEAUTY MENTOR”, is a Confidence Coach for Beauty Industry Professionals.

She is also a former Salon owner with over 20 years “behind the chair” experience and Founder of the Beauty Inspires Beauty Podcast. Jess has been a successful entrepreneur since 2001 and is so grateful for all the experiences the beauty industry has taught her! During her 20 years in the industry, She has Coached and Mentored Stylists to have their own successful businesses and is now made this her priority to help Beauty Professionals achieve their dreams! With a strong background in fitness and self-care, not only does Jess inspire Beauty Pro’s to grow their Business Confidently, but to do so in a way that focuses on their health and well-being! Being successful in the Beauty Industry is 100% possible with education, confidence, proper strategies and having a set of non-negotiables. Beauty Industry Professionals can absolutely create the life they desire and as “The Beauty Mentor” it is Jess’s true passion to help them do so!

Show Notes

Jessica Burgio joins Lesley Logan today to share her experience working in the service industry cutting hair while being a single mom and opening her own salon. They talk about the power of putting yourself in rooms with people you don’t know, the struggles and joys of being an entrepreneur, and tips on getting your first client.

If you have any comments or questions about the Be It pod shoot us a message at [email protected]. Or leave a comment below!

And as always, if you’re enjoying the show please share it with someone who you think would enjoy it as well. It is your continued support that will help us continue to help others. Thank you so much! Never miss another show by subscribing at LesleyLogan.co/subscribe.

In this episode you will learn about:

  • The power of putting yourself in rooms with people you don’t know
  • Social proof
  • It’s almost good that you don’t know what you don’t know
  • Starting a new career
  • Tips for getting your first client
  • Connecting with your peers
  • Being a recovering perfectionist

References/Links:

Transcript
INTRODUCTION

Lesley Logan
Hey you, welcome back to the Be It Till You See It podcast. Oh my Lord. My friend Jessica Burgio is our guest today and I cannot wait for you to dive into this episode. The interview is so much fun. Jessica has lived an incredible life and she is a total badass. 100% we got we talked about how she got started as a stylist, we talked about how she opened up her own studio, her own salon, and then how she went to the coaching business. And then we also dive into being a single mom at 40 and how she does all the things and or not, right, so we go to so many different parts about her. If you are thinking about, you know, really trying to put yourself out there, this is the episode for you. And I want you to make sure you listen because there are some little Be It drops throughout the entire episode that I don’t want you to miss. Check out the show notes, we’ve got her awesome bio, who she is and the confidence coach that she is today. And also how you can listen to her more on her own podcast Beauty Inspires Beauty. Her Instagram handle everything is there. So make sure that you take a look at all those things. Connect with Jessica, and let her know what you loved about this. But please enjoy. They’re there, I can’t even wait. I I couldn’t even stop her to ask her what the her Be It strategies would be. She literally just went right into it, which is incredible. And one of the things I love about her so much is that she just goes out and does it. So enjoy this episode right after these messages.

Welcome to the Be It Till You See It podcast where we talk about taking messy action, knowing that perfect is boring. I’m Lesley Logan, Pilates instructor and business fitness coach. I’ve trained thousands of people around the world and the number one thing I see stopping people from achieving anything is self doubt. My friends, action brings clarity and it’s the antidote to fear. Each week, my guests will bring Bold, Executable, Intrinsic and Targeted steps that you can use to put yourself first and Be It Till You See It. It’s a practice, not a perfect. Let’s get started.

EPISODE

Lesley Logan
Alright, everyone, welcome back. I am so excited. I’m so excited to talk to my friend Jessica Burgio. I hope I didn’t say her name wrong. I pretty much say all of my friends names on this podcast at this point. But she and I met a couple years ago, we sat next to each other, actually, I’m gonna rewind, we randomly met over a jumpsuit I was wearing at a bliss project. And she just said so many nice things to me. I was like, “This girl is awesome.” And then we were in a mastermind and we sat next to each other and I remembered you from that moment. And it’s just been it was it’s been so fun to see how you’ve grown from that was a time where you didn’t know what your thing was gonna be. But you had this idea and you and now you are coaching people in your industry on how they can do what you’re doing. And so I am going to let you introduce yourself even better than I could. But welcome to the show. I’m really excited that you’re here.

Jessica Burgio
I’m so excited to be here and it’s so exciting to watch you like start this and know that you know, I’ve seen it from before and to now it’s just it’s really cool to watch. And I’m kind of in the same boat as you. So yeah, we did. We met I was volunteering at the bliss project and you walked out with your girlfriends and you guys all had amazing hair and you were wearing this rockin like almost snakeskin looking, I thought they were pants at first. And I said, “Oh girl where’d you get those pants from?” And you like whipped your jacket off me like, “It’s a one piece. I got a coupon code for you.” And I was like, “Oh my God.” So we were instant best friends. And that’s really like the power of putting yourself in rooms around people that you don’t know. And so that’s why I love that you created this podcast based on Be It Till You See It. So my name is Jessica Burgio. I am a 20 year veteran in the hair industry and I recently in the last two years, got into coaching professionally, hairdressers and other creatives to six figures and beyond. Kind of taking themselves from being stuck behind the chair just trading time for money, into what other possibilities they could create with their business and their life. So it’s been quite the challenge to go from being an expert, expert in something, to then being a beginner. But, you know, I like to take a …

Lesley Logan
A beginner expert, (Jessica: Yeah) beginner expert you’re like, “I know what I’m doing but I don’t know what I’m doing.”

Jessica Burgio
Right right and so it’s kind of cool to not know what you don’t know because like you almost go back to that child-like, “Well, I can do it like everyone else is doing it. Why can’t I do it?” Right? Versus some people get stuck in the, “Well, everyone else is already doing it. I shouldn’t do it.” I’m more like, “Oh, there’s proof. Oh, okay. Like I can try it too kind of gives me permission.” So yeah, I’m I just turned 40 and it’s it’s been an interesting journey to get where I am now. So yeah, I’m sure I could talk for hours on all the things but …

Lesley Logan
I feel like we will have to circle back to a few things because I definitely I’m not 40 yet but I am approaching it and many of my friends have turned 40. So I actually was never paying attention my 40th birthday, but when all of your friends are, then you’re like, “Oh, oh, it’s coming. I don’t even know what it means.” So we’ll, we’ll have to circle back to that. But I want to go back to this, um, you seeing like other people doing something as social proof and that like invigorating you. And also, we’ll have to touch on like … it’s almost good that you don’t know what you don’t know. Because I have to say, even with the podcast, right? Like, I was like, “Oh, this is easy. I go live all the time.” Like, this is just, you know, we’ll just do that and then when you start doing it, they’re like, well, we need like, eight episodes for the first two weeks, then we need these and you have to, like, you have these show notes. And I’m like, “Oh, someone has to do all that.” (Lesley laughs)

Jessica Burgio
Well, they’re definitely they’re like best practices of what you should do to have a successful podcast, right? But you could have done it any damn well, way you pleased? Like there are people who (Lesley: Right) start messy and organized not by-the-book, but you know, you know, now better. And because we’ve had those experiences with the mastermind, we’ve had people that have gone before us, create successful, you know, monetizable podcasts, you’re like, “Okay, if I’m gonna do it, I’m gonna do it, right, I’m gonna invest properly, (Lesley: Yeah) put it out the best way I can.” Because I think at this stage in the game, if you’re gonna play like, it’s like, play as best as you can, and like, bring your A game.

Lesley Logan
Yeah, and I think that’s like, where the perfectionist can get into the, into the way because the best that you can doesn’t mean perfect. It just means the best you can, but a lot of people want the best that they can be to be better than what it is. And they get a little unsatisfied and, and I think that’s what holds people back. And it’s like, “No, actually,” like, even Maya Angelou said, like, “You do the best you can until you know better and then and then you just do better” and, and I have to say, like, the things that I did “perfectly” in air quotes, like big flops, anytime I threw something out messy action, it was like, like, you know, those like posts that you put up, and you’re like, “I just gotta get something up there.” And you’re like, “I’m just gonna do a one line like, this is all I’m gonna say.” And it’s like, the most love like the most comments, and the times you spent, like, making sure all the comments on the right spot like whomp, whomp. (Lesley laughs)

Jessica Burgio
Seriously, I know and I’m glad that we have those moments that remind us, and we see other people not being completely perfect. You know, it’s like, yeah, it gives you permission to kind of do it your own way, which, I mean, if we all did it the same exact way, like nobody would stand out.

Lesley Logan
No, no. So you, how long have you been a stylist?

Jessica Burgio
I just hit 20 years last September.

Lesley Logan
Wow, that is amazing. That’s because you’re only 40. Right? And so you’re like, “I started this as as 20.” So I, so you, you started 20 years ago? And, what is it like because as a Pilates instructor, like I go, I would go into a studio and I worked for a studio and then you’re like, gotta get clients. And it’s not, it’s not exactly like a hair salon, or someone’s like, “I’m gonna get my haircut today.” And then they just go to the place that’s close by, like, you know, is a little bit different. So what was it like to be a brand new stylist? And how did you kind of navigate being new to something?

Jessica Burgio
Well, fortunately, and unfortunately, there was no social media, there was no other way to get clients, but to learn how to go out and talk to people. So my mom was always that person who like she just literally couldn’t be in line without telling the lady in front of her, “Oh my god, I love your shoes,” or “Oh my god your bag” or being in an elevator where it’s just you and she was like just starting random conversation. So I think it was like a natural skill set that I just learned even though it like made my skin crawl when I was a kid because she embarrassed me so bad. But when it was my turn to go out there and like find clients and they were like, the only way you’re going to get people is if you go out and talk to them and you know, pass out your card, tell them we’re a new salon in town. I was like, “Okay, I can do it.” So I think by being prepared with like, what I was going to say, and then just showing up as the best version of myself, I did my hair, I did my makeup, I put a cute outfit on. You know, even for things like this. I tried to show up as the version I want people to remember me as because it’s not just like what you’re saying, it’s like how you’re saying it and how you’re looking. So it’s funny because I would have super cute like short hair. And people I would talk to people in a bit, “Oh my God, your hair. So cute. Yeah, I’ll come see you.” And I think to myself, “Well, I didn’t cut my own hair. Don’t you want her number?” (Jessica and Lesley laughs) Right? Like I didn’t actually cut my own hair but okay. But I think it was just like, they figured if you took so much pride in what you look like so it was easier for me to, you know, ask for the business by going out and talking to people and in relation to what a lot of your listeners are in the fitness world. You know, when I started personal training several years later, I did have a clientele base from behind the chair that I could pull from but then I also already knew how to talk to people. So if I saw them in the gym, or if I saw them needing assistance, I felt confident enough to just start asking questions, you know, not put myself on them like, “Hey, you need to work out with me.” But, “Hey, are you new here? Do you have any questions?” So I think it’s something that luckily, I mean, I still struggle with it sometimes like starting conversations, but I definitely have that in me from my mom where I will randomly just talk to people and so by doing that, it’s created so much easy like people ask me for my card.

Lesley Logan
So my mom is the same, like I remember, oh my gosh, I was a teenager in Santa Cruz, which is like two hours away from where I grew up where we lived. And we were all in matching like family muumuus. If you’re you don’t know what that is, like, look it up. It’s a Hawaiian print thing. And so my uncle lived in Hawaii, and he brought like, my grandparents their own matching set, my family that’s all matching set, like my aunt and uncle with their kids. So just like a picture, it’s like 15 people walking in a mall, in muumuus … for a family photo. This is definitely the 90s when you when you walk into a mall for a family photo. Anyways, I was just like, “Oh my God, I hope no one sees me.” And my mom ran into someone that she knew from like 15 years ago that she met in a grocery store line, because she talks to everybody. And so as embarrassing as that moment was something I learned as I got older was that she has this like gift of gab, and that she doesn’t there’s a place to go in this world where she won’t run into someone she knows, or she can’t talk to. And that made it… because I also started teaching Pilates when Facebook was a thing, but like not a thing, like you really used it to find your friends and didn’t promote your business on there. Like that was kind of weird. So so it was very useful to just be able to start a conversation. But I think that’s where people get hung up. It’s that that starting it, because they think they have to like talk about being a hairdresser or being a Pilates teacher or, you know, being a makeup artist. And it’s actually like, “No, you actually just say, hi, I like your shoes.”

Jessica Burgio
Yes. And that’s what’s so I think, intimidating for people on social media and why I think a lot of people struggle to close sales or to even grow their community or their audience because they don’t spend the time just creating conversation and connection. Like, if you’re in someone’s DM, if you’re looking to build your business, or if you’re a one on one coaching client, whether it whether you’re looking for clients, doing Pilates, hair, makeup, any of the things like you have to actually be social on social media to get people to attract to you. And so if you have a product or service that you’re trying to get out to them, just reaching out and saying, “Hey, I had this thing you want to buy it.” I mean, 99.9% no one’s gonna buy it. Right? Unless you’re a brand name …

Lesley Logan
It’s like the people on the street corner who are like trying to like, get you to buy something like on the street, like you’re like, “No, I don’t actually, I don’t even know what that is.”

Jessica Burgio
No. Right. And so like, there’s so many ways that we can talk about helping people with engagement and like starting conversations, there are people that you can pay to start conversations for you, if it’s in social media world, but the real magic happens when you can start authentic conversations in your in your, where you’re building your business. Because if you’re not online, or if you’re if you’re in a brick and mortar, like there’s nothing more important than like connecting with that community, like even the coffee shop people even if those people will never be your clients, you get in a relationship with the guy who serves you coffee down the street or where you grocery shop. Like they’re gonna be like, “Oh, there’s Lesley as a Pilates place.” Like you’re always (Lesley: Yeah) one person away from like referrals and I know social media …

Lesley Logan
100% I … I agree so much. And I, I can I remember a couple like smoothie shops, like the people the smoothie shop, because I would get my smoothie every day. And like they knew when I worked and they knew I would just talk to them. And I made sure they knew who I was and what I did. And, and of course, sure enough, I got people like, “Hey, so and so at the smoothie place told me that you’re a Pilates teacher, I was like saying I was tired of my workouts and they’re like, ‘Oh, you should work with her.'” They’ve never worked with me before they just like me as a human being. And so I think that it’s, it sounds so simple. And that’s where people really get hung up is that they start to doubt themselves where they think that they have to, like, you know, wow, people, and it’s like, no, it just actually it’s really about having a conversation and, and you can be an introvert and still have those conversations too, you know, (Jessica: Totally, totally.) So when you first started, like we all first start the first client is like the hardest one, like the for, getting anyone who’s like a random stranger to like, give you money is always the hardest thing no matter what it is that you’re trying to do. How like, what about that, like, how did you deal with like, you only have one client when you know that you want to have a full scale, or you need to have a full book of clients.

Jessica Burgio
Sure. So if I go back to when I started, I did multiple things to get me to where I got my first couple paid clients. So the salon that I worked at, so it could be a studio that you work at, if they do any sort of apprenticeship program, or assisting or shadowing or whatever, we would have to go out and get models. So we were not allowed to bring in the same model more than once we were not allowed to bring in family members, we that’s when I first learned how to go out and get models. So that was convincing people to even let your let you do their hair for free. So first I had to sell myself my services for free. And then that taught me how to sell my services for you know to get paid. And I think the more you, not give away, but the more that you invest in your business by doing services or giving away training in the beginning, that word of mouth business will will just spiral if you’re good, if you can be consistent, and if you can give a good experience with your client, you don’t have to be the best trainer or the best hairdresser. But people want to see you win people want to support you. So if they link up with you early on, and they’re getting some sort of deal or discount, you know, it really only takes two or three amazing clients to build up your whole book of business like, and that’s where I got really lucky. My mentor was overflowing with clients and because I put myself in a situation where there was overflow in a bigger salon that trickled down to me, so I didn’t really ever have to sell myself, they knew his clients knew that he had trained me. So that spoke for one and then then seeing a little bit of me and what I was doing that built the confidence and they were willing to let me you know, try on them. And then therefore, they turned into my lifelong clients.

Lesley Logan
Yeah, I um I do think like, I when I think of a hairdresser without hairstyles, I think like, “What was it like to cut someone’s hair for the first time it wasn’t a mannequin?”

Jessica Burgio
Scary. Of course super scary.

Lesley Logan
And I’m like, ” What if I cut it wrong? What if I like chopped off my …

Jessica Burgio
Oh my God, I cut so many people’s hair wrong, but that’s what I’m saying. Because I was honest, like, if I did do something wrong, if I did not do what they asked, I wouldn’t charge them, I would say, “I didn’t quite give you what you wanted, I’m sorry, it’s three inches shorter than I told you is going to be, you know, come back in a couple months and give me another try.” And you know what they would they would it’s like, if someone’s going to a new stylist, that you’re not expecting you to be like, the people charging $300 for a haircut. And that’s why beauty schools exist, because you can practice on real people at a very discounted price. They know what they’re getting. Yeah, so there’s, there’s ways that you can build your confidence in this industry anyway, so. (Lesley: Yeah) But some people just jump out of the gate, and they just start taking clients, I think if you’re a natural at it, there you go.

Lesley Logan
Well, and that’s it. Like there’s multiple ways to do something. And you can see how someone sticks out, you can see multiple successful people and ask them, whatever it is that you’re wanting to do. The good news is that every idea has been done. And so there’s always going to be some sort of expert or someone who’s known for that thing. And you can look at them, and you can see and go, okay, you’re not going to do their exact path, because it doesn’t exist, everyone starts at a different point just because of life. But you can go, “Okay, so they went through a really successful studio, and they went through these schools, they trained by these people,” and then they, you can kind of see a roadmap. And just because you follow the roadmap doesn’t mean it will end up that way for you. But you don’t have, it’s not like a guessing game either. There’s like options for you. So you have been styling for 20 years, and a few years back, you’re like, “I’ve actually become very successful and I’m seeing a problem. And this is what I love because I think a lot of people,” like, “What do I do? I don’t know what to do.” I’m like, there’s a lot of things that you’re already noticing a problem. And you notice that like a lot of stylists were not as successful as you are, and you wanted to help them do that.

Jessica Burgio
Totally, I think you know how you say it, you know. Some people cannot see what’s possible, they may have gotten into the industry under the impression that they just want a job where they can make their own schedule, where they can maybe charge what they want. But if they weren’t put in a salon like I was when I first started at 19 years old, I saw what was possible immediately. So my standard, my levels were just at a different place than people that stayed where I grew up, which was only 30 minutes from where I went into downtown San Diego, and worked in one of the biggest most well known salons where there was over 40 stylists there, there was over 40 assistants at the time. So like you had to bring your A game to stand out. And so watching how these people treated this career, which kind of was an offhand back in the day, like, “Oh, you couldn’t figure out what you want to do with your life. So you went to beauty school,” it changed the whole conversation around what this industry was capable of. I mean, I saw people driving really nice cars, dressing like rock stars, charging 3 – 400 dollars ahead 20 years ago. And that’s when I was like, “Oh, the possibilities are endless.” And so by the time it was my turn to go from assisting to being on the floor, like I had a standard of six figures was not even in question like it was done deal. I’m going to get that and three for six months. And so when I see people struggling from the very beginning, it’s confusing to me. But I also realize not everybody started the way I started. Not everybody had that experience. So and it’s fine if money isn’t what you’re necessarily chasing, but most people who say money’s not the thing they’re searching for, they want nice things, they want to be able to travel, they want freedom, and I’m like, “Well, then you need to make money in order to have those opportunities.” So let’s keep it real, especially if you live in San Diego, where I live, it’s like 100 grand a year is barely enough to get by. (Lesley: Right) Yeah. And in the industry. It costs money to work like there’s so much overhead. So, you know, I think seeing that there was such a struggling issue. I moved from a big salon to a small space to another big salon. And it was in that time where we were all booth renters. So we were all basically independent entrepreneurs and we did work on one house, but there weren’t really like rules for your particular business. And that’s when I really started to see the big difference between me and say, the people next to me, you know, there were a few of us that that bounced in those six figures, but not much over 100 grand, it was always around 100 to 200. Like, and that is a really good career, like income in this industry for working strictly behind the chair. But there were so many other people out of those 40 stations that probably barely touched 40,000 a year, work consistently booked, weren’t that busy struggled to, you know, keep their books filled, always had second jobs, and just couldn’t seem to figure it out. And, and after I left that big salon and went open my own place, I personally was missing the community, missing the hype that I got every day from coming into that place that made me step my game up, dress a little bit better, you know, give my client a better experience, (Lesley: Right) because it’s like your environment really does shape your creativeness and all of the things in your abilities. So when I removed myself from that big space, and I had to go provide all that for myself, like the support, the inspiration, I had a really hard time. So it was a combination of those two things, the community and the network was missing for me at that point, especially at my level, I’d already been in the game 15 years at that point when I left a big place. And then also the ability to see people come up in the industry and never quite make it if you will. (Lesley: Yeah) So (Lesley: I know what you mean.) those two things that I was like, “There’s got to be a better way, how can I go through the 20 years that I put in and create some sort of manual or system or program that they can follow to understand,” because most of us didn’t go to college, most of us didn’t get a business degree. So we started (Lesley: Right) off the creative who just wants to have fun. And they teach you how to make money in this industry kind of but they don’t teach you how to keep it. They don’t teach you what to do with it. They don’t teach you how to be smart with it. And it’s a cash business. So there was multiple things that I knew under that umbrella, why people weren’t able to hit those numbers. So I mean, I could go down a rabbit hole of all the things that … under that.

Lesley Logan
So here’s what you know, I think like, a lot of times when people are thinking like, “What am I gonna do next?” Or “I’m not really happy with what I’m doing?” Like, “What should I do next?” It’s like, if you just look around, like the experience that you have, is like, you can’t trade, you can’t buy that, right? Like, that’s your experience and those life lessons. And so you can actually see people who are behind you and go, “Hey, actually, I can help you to do that because I’ve done that. And I know all the ways not to do that. And there and so I’ve seen people not do it well, and I’ve seen people do it well, and here’s how you do it well.” And it’s true. Like, I don’t care what your job is, or where you went, like no one’s career really teaches them all the things. You know, for Pilates instructors, no one taught them anything about business. I know. I ran studios, I went to one. And you know, my when I asked like, “Oh, how much do I charge?” people like, “Well, you know, so and so the studio renting from is charging this much have been teaching for 20 years, and this person is teaching for five years, and they’re charging this much. So you just charge a little less than that.” And it’s like, but that’s not how you know how to make money. Like I was just sitting there going, but then how much money do I make a year? Right? Because I was coming from a job where I had a salary, I was managing a jewelry store. And so I knew that at the end of the year, I will have made this much money plus my commission, right? And so I was just really confused. I was like, “But then how much? Like how much money am I making doing this job?” And everyone around me was like, “There’s no money there’s no money in Pilates.” I’m like, “How is that possible? How can that be no… Why is everyone doing it then? Like, why would you teach it if there’s nothing here,” and I just learned is that no one had taught people how to like, actually figure out how to make a liv… more than a living, and or a living like even that. And so what you did was just like see, like, “Wow, not only do I want community,” so you like, we’re solving a problem of your own, but you were also were like, “there are so many people who are missing like this amazing stuff that can take them to the next level.” And with such an abundance mindset, you weren’t, you weren’t thinking, “Well, if I help every stylist out then like there’ll be no clients for me.” You’re like, “No, if I help every stylist down, it’s gonna be a better place.” I love that so much. So you started Beauty Inspires Beauty two years ago?

Jessica Burgio
Yeah, I think it’s, it’s been about two years now. Yeah, the time goes by so fast. So I felt like it needed to have a separate identity from myself. And as much as I like it to be the Jessica show most of the time. I knew that I wanted to create a community that had like a place to live, with or without me, whether I was there or not. So yeah, Beauty Inspires Beauty kind of came from inspiration from Cat Golden and with Nurses Inspire Nurses. She was building that community and helping me figure out how to put one together myself, and she was someone else we met in the group. So, you know, she helped me kind of map out a program and then she helped me map out how to build a community and you know, I’d always love swag, so who doesn’t love a cute shirt that says something clever on it. I’m all about comfy, you know, stuff like that. So that part was easy to bring together. And I started these networking branches. And they were basically just a way for us hairdressers to get together because normally, if we go to something, it’s like a class where you’re learning a skill set, and you get very little time to network and talk with each other. And, you know, I thought if I could put us all in a room together, maybe have a speaker or I would teach maybe some sort of a workshop or something tangible that they could take. But the real point was to get everybody together, and and create community so we could collaborate and create content and do all that kind of stuff. So we had about four of those, they were going really well. And actually, the last one we did was in January of last year, all around reverse engineering your income and figuring out what your hourly worth was in this industry, just like Pilates where people don’t know how much they’re making, they guess all year long, and don’t save enough for taxes like so much bullshit. (Lesley laughs) So that was the last one I actually taught and it was sold out like 25 people at my studio and everybody was hungry for more. And it was like, such a amazing space and then COVID hit. (Lesley: Yeah) And … I hadn’t quite introduced the idea of pivoting in this industry, yet I was still just talking about community and like, you know, getting a better grip on your business. When I tried to take them virtual, it was like be because we were forced to shut down in the way we were, people weren’t prepared. So (Lesley: Yeah) really, back in COVID did me a service by showing people now a year later that you need to have other options, you need to have a backup plan. And you need to be in a position where someone’s not going to take your only stream of income away from you. So that’s (Lesley: Yeah) where I put my money where my mouth wasn’t invested in a network marketing company called Monat, which is strictly hair and skincare and a little bit of wellness. And it was just in alignment with my brand and what I’ve been selling and using and talking about for 20 years. So that’s why I chose that route. But if you’re passionate about other things like there are so many companies that are already built for you that you can jump into working the little bit of time that you have and get that going. So you can have residual income or create another stream of income that doesn’t necessarily mean you’re trading time for money. If I don’t show up and have that client, I won’t get paid. If that client no shows me, I won’t get paid. With businesses like this, you can invest, very little to start and they can build as you go. So if and when something like this happens, you at least have options.

Lesley Logan
Yeah, and you and you said it right there, there has been an alignment. Um, yeah, I know. I think like COVID well, I think we’ll look back in year from now two years from now. And realize like the gifts that were given for a lot of us just like highlighting things that maybe some people were ignoring, some just really getting us more prepared for the future. I want to, so you mentioned to me earlier, it was like, you know, now you’re like a beginner at this coaching and this creating this thing. And so it’s not it’s not a baby, I mean it’s still in its infancy as far as businesses go. But with those first few meetups, I think a lot of people get so nervous if they’re gonna bring people together that first thing because you don’t know how it’s going to be, right? So you’re just like, “Think that I want this to be good. I think it’s going to be good.” So I would love it if you could like, take us through like, what did you say to yourself before you went to that first meetup? What it what was it? Because I mean, like that to me is like the ultimate Be It Till You See It because like, you’ve not actually done this before. So now you’ve had to do it. And you don’t know how it’s gonna go. So can you take us through what that felt like?

Jessica Burgio
Yes. And this is actually a story I haven’t really talked about out loud. So I think this is going to help so many people too. And looking back, I’m glad I did it this way. But I also, of course, wish I had done it a little bit differently, but it is what it is. So events that I’d gone to prior had usually not been hosted by one person. Normally there’s a couple speakers, there’s excitement, there’s hype, there’s all the fluff in between, like, you know, so I thought in order for me to put on my first event, I had to have all of that right. Hello, go back to our perfectionist moment, right? It has to be perfect. Well, I’ve planned a wedding. I’ve planned parties. I planned that. So I was like, I need a DJ, I need mics. I need an outdoor venue. I need drinks included. I need them to have gifts. I need way too much food. I mean, I just did the most. And then I decided I decided instead of me leading the workshop, I needed to have expert guests. Well, the whole point was just the network. But I turned it into, well, it’s not gonna be good enough unless I have a speaker who’s like world renowned celebrity stylist. And then well, he’s coming. So I should ask my mentor to come and speak. Well, I tried to do too many things at once. I had this grand idea that I was going to record two podcast episodes while I was there between the two of them. It was meant to be like a Q&A session so that people could listen in and I could ask questions, and then we could open it up to the floor cuz it was there’s about 30 people there. So in hindsight afterwards, the first guy that came on, I didn’t know him that well, and he was a celebrity stylist from Vegas. I will name not name names, but this motherfucker took over my show like and at the same time I was trying to be like, “It’s not about me,” but he made it all about him. He showed up with a screen he showed it up with prompts, he showed up but like a me… guided meditation, and then at the end, let everybody know that he was doing coaching. (Lesley laughs) The etiquette bro, like, like so and one of my girlfriends, you’ll know Kiersten she came up to me in the middle of his thing, because he did that she goes, “This is your event, you better figure out how to take it back right now. He’s about to steal your show. (Lesley laughs) And at the time I was like…

Lesley Logan
… that’s a great friend to have.

Jessica Burgio
It wasn’t. But at the time, I was like, “Oh, this is great. He’s doing an amazing,” but then I was like, “Well, they remember him.” I think like it was one of those moments where you wanted to just let it be what it was. But at the same time, after I walked away, I was like, “I could have handled that, I should have stepped up and done my best nervous or not. And given them whatever I could.” And it was funny because it went way longer than it was supposed to. And then by the time we got everybody connecting, which you know, we do at the Bliss Project. And we’ve learned so many great techniques on how to get people to talk and connect with each other. They don’t want to stop talking to each other. And it was in that moment that I was like, “This is really what they wanted to come for.” The speakers were great (Lesley: Yeah) but now they’re talking to each other. Now they’re collaborating now, you know, salon down the streets talking to this salon down the street when they’ve never met, even though they’ve worked next to each other for all these years. Like, you usually stay in your bubble in a salon and you don’t like collaborate with other stylists or other salon owners. And there’s so many like independent suite salons now that people are working alone, especially since COVID. So they don’t have (Lesley: Yeah) that community and no one to talk to you about business, about ideas or any of that. And it was in that moment with that workshop that I was like, I got the next ones. So after that the next ones were like me leading me coming up with something, you know, to teach on and to share. And then just really collaborating getting them to talk to each other. And then when I did feedback, that was their favorite part was talking to each other.

Lesley Logan
I, this is awesome. And I think like, I think back to like some of the things that I’ve done, where I based on other people’s things who have budgets that are, you know, we just only dream up. And the reality is, is the part that people have always loved the most is just the time after whatever they came for, where they just hang out. (Lesley laughs)

Jessica Burgio
Yeah. And I think … close to $3,000 on that little, oh, clearly, I didn’t make any money. I didn’t get my podcast out of it, I got a shitty video, like, nobody could eat the food because they were sitting on this big table. So it was just such a great learning experience. And from that point forward, they were all profitable after that.

Lesley Logan
But I think you know, even if someone’s listening and going, oh, well that like now what do I do? It’s like, I think you had to do that one so that you could end up getting the one like having what you have now like you had the first thing the first one do anything. If you may as well go as big as you actually can and afford and with what you have. And then you can get the surveys back and then realize like what people really want you can reflect back on what you really want cuz you just don’t always know like (Lesley laughs)

Jessica Burgio
And don’t don’t get it don’t get me wrong, people were raving afterwards. I was the only one it’s like the wedding. We’re like a couple things going wrong and nobody knows but you, it was one of those moments like like I would say more than half of the girls that I knew from that that came up to they’re like, “Oh my God can you do these every month? We like are excited. Are you gonna have a membership?” Like they were they didn’t (Lesley: That so cool.) Yeah.

Lesley Logan
You know what I love that you bring up the wedding because it’s true like people I’ve done this before ever got married, my friend was getting married and she was stressing about something and this other girl in the bridal party goes just so you know, we stressed for hours over what kind of tablecloth we were going to use. And the tablecloth on the gift table. Like that one was like had to be this particular lace and we were really we like shipped it in from like somewhere else. And she’s like, “I got the pictures back. And that tablecloth was never put on the table. (Jessica: Oh!) And I didn’t even see it at the wedding.” So she’s like, just be careful what you stress over. And I just remembered that when I when I got married. I was like, “People don’t see the table. They don’t remember the tablecloth,” you know? So … I do think that you’re right like you the way you perceive things is different than what they perceived. And I think that’s also what a great takeaway for people to think is that like, what we perceive is like the worst mistake or like, “Oh my god, I can’t believe I did that,” is not what people see. Like they’re like, you know, I recently I was teaching a live masterclass, and the tech service provider we used decided to end my broadcast and I wasn’t using zoom, I was using something else because it’s way easier to send out a replay to hundreds of people. And I’ve used it before it’s never had this and just like I don’t know, just decided you’re done. And I was like, “Oh yeah,” and so I could still chat to them. And I was like, “Here’s a zoom link” and like I moved him over to zoom and I was freaking out while I was coming over. I’m like take a deep breath. And I thought no one’s gonna want to sign up for my thing at the end because they’re like, this girl can’t even keep her like masterclass, like on a platform, you know, and you know what? Everyone moved over, which is a sign that they were loving it and they were so impressed with how quick I was able to handle it. It was more impressive than I was giving it credit for, so we just don’t always know what’s on the label more inside the bottle. (Lesley laughs)

Jessica Burgio
Oh my God, that’s such a good story too. And honestly, like, I think until you do something for the first time, like, give yourself some grace, if you’re thinking about creating something or doing something, just know that you, I could have done that same event for $300. When got their own drinks, like, just all the things you think things have to be a certain way, like, if you have an idea, or if you have something you want to start or build. Yeah, I get another book club. I just wanted to get people together in the industry and say it’s only for beauty professionals or, you know, there’s a way to start, that doesn’t have to be like Lori Harder, or whatever, I think because we stayed around so many women who are powerful and doing big things. Like my little meetup in the back patio of this coffee shop felt like so small compared to but you know, she tells the story, she started small to she started with little wine meetups that she would do for free. It’s like, we all have to start somewhere. So like be okay with being a beginner.

Lesley Logan
Yeah. Oh, I love that. Okay, I want to talk really quickly about you’re, you’re a single mom, and you’re 40. And you’re writing your own business. And I just think like, that will resonate with so many women listening to this, because I do think that it’s easy to get caught up if you are a mom. And you’re like, “Well, I’ve got kids, I have to take care of them, their priority” or, you know, and for you, you you’re doing it all. So can you touch on like, what that’s like, what your secret sauce is to making it all work, what you’re thinking, what you’re looking forward to? I mean, there’s, I think there’s probably greatness and being single as well.

Jessica Burgio
Okay, so I’m going to answer that in a way you probably didn’t think I was gonna answer or maybe even wants you, but you’re catching me on a full moon and the week before I’m starting my period. So I’m gonna tell you, I don’t do all the things myself, I have a lot of help with my mother, his dad is amazing. So I don’t do it all by myself, I literally have the best support system as far as like that backend is concerned. I have always been fiercely independent when it comes to like my business and stuff. So I think that’s just been a progression from before I was single or even a mother. So because I kind of had those boundaries, habits, just things I showed up for anyways, it was it was easier, not easy, for them to continue on, even after having a baby. Now, for the not so pretty part. Like yesterday was one of those days, it was ugly here in San Diego. I was in my field, I had a hundred things to do and I didn’t want to do any of them. I questioned everything, I called my best friend. And I was like, “I don’t think coaching is for me, I don’t like talking to people who can’t get their shit…” Like, I went down the rabbit hole. So just know, like with hairdressing people think everyday should be fun. You’re, you’re being creative, it’s work, it’s super hard. And sometimes you have a day full of shitbag clients that just dump all this bullshit on you. And you’re like, “Fuck this,” like, you know, so and then the next day you have amazing clients. So everything is an ebb and flow. And because I am like a recovering perfectionist, also being able to be okay, not having a perfect day, not feeling amazing, not being super motivated. Even before I do things like this, I’m like, “I don’t really want to do that.” Yes, I do. Yes, I do. And when I’m doing them, it’s through the power of doing and taking the action that I’m reinspired, I’m really motivated, I’m refocused. Because if you’re an independent, if you’re a creative entrepreneur, if you’re an accidental entrepreneur, you d`on’t have a boss up your ass, you don’t have someone on a strict schedule telling you all the things you need to do. You see people in corporate if they don’t get this, this this and done between nine and five, like they’re fired. They don’t get their bonuses or the fire. But we don’t have anybody doing that for us. So I have to do that for myself, which is extremely difficult, and makes me question that I should go get a corporate job every other month or every six months. I felt like that for 20 years. I’ve thought every about every five years or so I’ll be like, “I don’t want to do this anymore. Let me see what else I could do.” And just the freedoms that come with running your own business, the creative space that I can give myself like because I gave myself that shit day yesterday. I’ve been on fire today. I had an amazing workout this morning. I created a whole new business this morning with website and domain name and an Instagram like, “I am on it today.” (Lesley laughs) So like that’s the beautiful thing like Mondays suck, Tuesday’s … the new Friday? I don’t know. So, yes and okay

Lesley Logan
I know. I can see why you thought maybe I wouldn’t like this answer. I freaking love this answer. I love the honesty in it. And I think that that’s you know, it’s there’s not not every day is like highlight worthy or even like worth telling people about and there are days in life that you just want to quit. But I I think that that honesty is exactly equal to here. And then I the beginning I want to highlight is that like, you have boundaries. And I think that that is where I don’t care if you’ve got kids or don’t have kids, like if you don’t have boundaries, everything hard, and you lean on people who love you. And I think a lot of people think they have to do that I have to do it myself. And it’s like no that we used to live in like commute, like commute, like, (Jessica: We used to be in tribes.) So there are people who would pick the food while you were babysitting, like there you don’t have to do this on our own.

Jessica Burgio
Yeah, and I’m going through an interesting transition in my life too, with my son’s dad, because he is going to this next level of success in his business, which is requiring him to be gone a lot. And for me to kind of pick up the slack, or I feel like I have to pick up the slack. And as a mom, I don’t know if anybody’s on here, that’s a mom that can relate like when you have, if you had a semi successful or successful career prior to having a kid, nine times out of 10, you backed off a little bit for a little while. And if you had a client based business like mine, those people went somewhere else. So it took me from the time he was born, till probably three or four years later to rebuild where I was, before I had him, not progress, knock your further, not make more money, like I literally had to kind of rebuild and start all over. Because I chose to have my son at 30 versus early 20, so that I could be home more, but then come to the point where you’re a single mom, and you’re kind of having to balance and do all these things on your own. There was a lot of resentment and frustration I had with his dad now that his career is taking off and things are. it’s a lot to juggle. So yes, having boundaries and being very clear about what I need, and definitely being okay with asking for help. If I need a break, “Hey, Mom, can you please take Kai,” I know it’s my night, but like, I need a night off or I need to go out with my friends or I need to go on a trip for three days to get out of here not do anything. Also the rules to life with social media, I’m supposed to post every day well, I don’t feel like it yesterday. I didn’t post for like three days. You have to do it on your own terms, in your own way. (Lesley: Yeah) Otherwise, you won’t be sustainable. You’ll want to quit. You want to give up all those things.

Lesley Logan
All right. So Jessica, where can people follow you? I mean, I’m in they’re falling in love with you, I’m sure but like, you’ve got a podcast, you’re on Instagram. Like what’s the best place to find you?

Jessica Burgio
Yes. So we have the Beauty Inspires Beauty podcast, where you can hear it more of my life lessons from behind the chair, but also just success stories of people coming up in the industry. Similar to what I just shared with you guys today. I really dig into where they started, how they got there and what their plans are. And then on Instagram, if you want more of this good stuff, it’s that @jessicaburgio was my Instagram. And yeah, I just I feel like you know, I just want to leave everybody with done is better than perfect. Messy action trump’s no action and just start where you are listening to people like Lesley staying around other good, positive propaganda is what is going to push you to whatever your next level is.

Lesley Logan
Oh, amazing. I mean, you’re right that’s how you Be It. It’s like done is better than perfect. Take messy action. I love. I love all those. It’s my I think we have some shirts we’re making with them. (Jessica: Yes) I love them. I have a I have a shirt I want to say that says “Nobody wants to be friends with perfect” because it’s like, (Jessica: Yes, I want one.) (Jessica and Lesley laughs) We’ll send you one, we’ll send you one. Oh my gosh, Jessica, thank you so much for taking time out of your life and your business to share so honestly who you are and how you got here and how other people can be it till they see it. So thank you and I can’t wait till next time. And everyone thank you so much for listening. Please make sure you screenshot this, tag Jessica and I in it. And let us know your favorite takeaways that is how people more people can hear about us. And, also hear about what Jessica is rocking because if she inspired you and I want you to listen to more that she has to say. Alright, we’ll see you at the next one.

Lesley Logan
That’s all I’ve got for this episode of the Be It Till You See It podcast! One thing that would help both myself and future listeners is for you to rate this show and leave a review. And, follow or subscribe for free wherever you listen to podcasts. Also, make sure to introduce yourself over at the @be_it_pod on Instagram! I would love to know more about you. Share this episode with whoever you think needs to hear it. Help us help others to BE IT TILL YOU SEE IT. Have an awesome day!

Lesley Logan
‘Be It Till You See It’ is a production of ‘As The Crows Fly Media’.

Brad Crowell
It’s written, produced, filmed and recorded by your host, Lesley Logan and me, Brad Crowell.

Lesley Logan
Kevin and Bel at Disenyo handle all of our audio editing and some social media content.

Brad Crowell
Our theme music is by Ali at APEX Production Music. And our branding by designer and artist, Gianfranco Cioffi.

Lesley Logan
Special thanks to our designer Jaira Mandal for creating all of our visuals (which you can’t see because this is a podcast) and our digital producer, Jay Pedroso for editing all the video each week so you can.

Brad Crowell
And to Meridith Crowell for keeping us all on point and on time.

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