How Your Inner Child

Leads You and the

Influence of ‘No’

Ep. 121 ft. Maggie Daniels

“Listen to your inner child, that’s your voice.”

Maggie Daniels

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Bio

Maggie Daniels is a poet, writer, and director passionate about storytelling through her raw perspective. She was born and raised in the bible belt. The notorious culture of southern grit and charm shines through her words giving readers a sense of home and familiar comforts. Maggie’s work reflects the mountains of emotion one can experience with life, love, & loss in a way that is deeply honest and healing for those reading. Her mother used to tell her she was a magenta girl living in a khaki world, that analogy shows through in her work as a unique take on the human experience.

Show Notes

Through the eyes of a native storyteller and experiencer of human emotion, tune in for powerful insights of the human conditions and the things that keep us moving forward.

If you have any comments or questions about the Be It pod shoot us a message at [email protected]. Or leave a comment below!

And as always, if you’re enjoying the show please share it with someone who you think would enjoy it as well. It is your continued support that will help us continue to help others. Thank you so much! Never miss another show by subscribing at LesleyLogan.co/subscribe.

In this episode you will learn about:

  • Your inner child is how you find your voice
  • Keep going, you’ll get to your destination.
  • ‘No’ isn’t scary
  • Rejected that leads to something better
  • The importance of finding the right people
  • Process of publishing
  • Writing despite dyslexia

References/Links:

Transcript

INTRODUCTION

Lesley Logan
Hey, Be It listener. How are you babe? I am so excited for you to hear this conversation. I really excited. I had no idea what this conversation would go but I knew I wanted to have this woman on. Personally, I’m very curious about anybody who publishes poetry. It’s a type of writing style that I’ve never dabbled into. And I really was like, “Oh, I really liked what she’s up to. I think this is really amazing. I want to bring her on.” Also, because she, well she is dyslexic, and I was like anyone who has that, and then is able to write and produce things and things like that like that is a be it till you see it story that I have to share with you. And what what this conversation goes into, I’m just cannot wait for you to have this in your ears. I think you’re gonna want to put this one on save and have it as a reminder through yourself because not only are we all creatives, not only are we all able to, to do more than we give ourselves credit for. But she has some gems of stories in here, that have happened to us in different ways. And we forget them and we tone them down and we tell ourselves, “ah whatever.” And I am here to tell you and this whole episode is here for you, that we have to have to have to stop getting in our own way. And if you’re going to tell a story, make it a book, make it a story you tell but don’t tell it just to yourself, just hold you back. Right? Use use your creativity of these whoppers that you’re telling yourself to actually put out something in the universe that changes your life and someone else’s. You know, so anyways, I’m just I’m gonna let this episode continue to speak for itself. So after this message, here is Maggie Daniels.

Lesley Logan
Welcome to the Be It Till You See It podcast where we talk about taking messy action, knowing that perfect is boring. I’m Lesley Logan, Pilates instructor and fitness business coach. I’ve trained thousands of people around the world and the number one thing I see stopping people from achieving anything is self doubt. My friends, action brings clarity and it’s the antidote to fear. Each week, my guest will bring Bold, Executable, Intrinsic and Targeted steps that you can use to put yourself first and Be It Till You See It. It’s a practice, not a perfect. Let’s get started.

EPISODE

All right, Be It listener. I’ve got someone special for you, Maggie Daniels is here. And I was really intrigued by her for a variety of reasons. But you’re going to understand in a moment when she starts talking, but I actually find people who can take time to write very interesting. I think everybody, at some point has thought, “Oh, maybe a write a book, or might be nice to sit down and write something down.” And then inevitably think we’re not writers. We don’t know what we’re doing. And and then we get in our head, and then we think, “Oh, I can’t do this.” And we get impostor syndrome around it. So I just wanted to bring on Maggie to talk about how she got to where she is, and give you some advice along the way. So thank you for being here. Maggie, can you tell everybody who you are and what you’re writing about?

Maggie Daniels
Thank you so much for having me today. Yes, I’m, I’m a poet, writer, director. I use poetry for like the micro moments of emotion to process like what I’m feeling in the moment. And then I use screenplays to like, dive deeper into my psyche, like through the characters, like, “Why did this trigger me? Why do I feel this way?” And I am really glad you brought up the imposter syndrome and the insecurity because I had that for years, like I’ve been writing my whole life. And I never considered myself a writer. Isn’t that crazy?

Lesley Logan
That’s that, it’s crazy. And also, like, I completely understand it. (Maggi: Yeah.) You know,

Maggie Daniels
Yeah. And it was one of those things I didn’t go to college, I grew up very dyslexic, in a small town in the south, so I just didn’t, internally, I just had this voice that wasn’t mine in my head that said, “You know, you don’t know enough words, you’re not smart enough. Like, there’s someone else with that job already.” Like, you know what I mean? (Lesley: Yeah) And I remember my mother in law sent me this book. And I can’t remember the exact name of it, but it had it had magic in the title, where it was like, a pun on words, like creativity is literal magic. And ideas, bounce around, like, if you don’t use them, they’ll go away and find someone else that will. And the crazy thing is that everyone’s capable of it. Every human being, I feel like we were here to be creative not to work and pay bills and die. I feel like our soul needs to express itself in many forms, whatever that may be. And a lot of people don’t realize that creativity isn’t just making art, creativity is anything that drives you, and makes you want to get up and do something and make something like that could be crafting, that could be engineering, that could be anything making rockets. (Lesley: Yeah) Whatever drives you to want to create something, is I feel like the basic necessity of our souls.

Lesley Logan
Ah, I mean, agreed. And I actually think like, that’s becoming more and more something that a lot of people are talking about, like we’re all born to be creative. And I think a lot of people that, “Oh, it’s those left brainers or those right brainers” or whatever side of the brain it is. We’ll go back to the neurologist who is on the show for that. But I don’t, we weren’t given like only half a brain, we have a whole brain, we can use it. And we we all have this ability to be creative. And I want to go back to the that voice in your head. Because I, I think that we all have that voice. And some of us have the volume turned up louder (Maggie: Yeah) on that voice and others. And it is, it’s that voice that holds back some of the most amazing people out there. Because every single person has a story that can help somebody else like we learned through story, right? We learned, we don’t remember, like statistics, but we remember the story that was told around the numbers. And that kind of helps us there. We can visualize that story. So, how did you get that voice volume to turn down enough for you to attempt what you’re now doing?

Maggie Daniels
Oh, man, it was a lot of different things. I really want to say I had to do with a lot of different influences. Gary Vee is one of them. I don’t know him personally, but just following him on social media is a very positive mindset in person. And a lot of his like personality and his branding is he just puts out positive just, that’s his vibe. And always he’s just reminding the public like, “Hey, that voice in your head isn’t you? Like, don’t listen to it, like find the one that’s you in there.” And I was emotionally, physically and sexually abused as a child. So I had a lot of different voices in there. And it took me a while to tune out to remember which one was mine, but I kind of went back to like my five year old self, and that inner child, and I feel like that’s how you find your voice, is it’s your inner child, (Lesley: Yeah) and just have to listen for him because they’re, they’re quieted by all the noise. And the best advice I ever got was from my mentor, dir… film director and writer, Diane Bell. She told me do, “What you want, the rest is noise. So, listen to your inner child, that’s your voice. And just go back to an age where you really felt your personality, like, started or like rounded out to your core to who you are.” And for me, that was five years old. And from then on, I was who I am. And yeah, I feel like find that age, and that’s your voice and you and you just whatever you’re doing in life is to protect that part of yourself. Like, think of it as a separate entity, almost like your inner child is someone that you need to treat that you wish that you were the adult in your life kind of thing. (Lesley: Yeah) Like that you were there to protect them. And I feel like that’s the first step of healing.

Lesley Logan
Yeah, I think we also like, you just said that, like, we also like protect, sometimes we do things to protect them so much that it’s actually holding us back. Like, (Maggie: Yes) does things help to get you to survive and get to this point. And then (Maggie: Yes) you know, and I think that’s, um, I think that’s really interesting. Like, I was talking with my own therapist, but I was like, when when the pandemic happened, I like fe… like was like, it was almost ease like, like, the world crashing down. And like, everything canceling on my calendar… (Maggie: It was relatable. I was like, “What is in my world?”) Oh, I totally get this survival mode, check, guess what, but then, a few months later, when we moved and all this stuff, and, and she’s like, “You know, you don’t need to be in that mode anymore.” And I was like, “Oh, I’m still driving in that mode.” (Maggie: Yeah) And so it’s like, it’s so good that we can tap into that, it’s so good that we have the ability to protect ourselves when needed, because, you know, sometimes you’re walking down the street with like, maybe somebody you want to, like, have a contract, book deal, (Maggie: Yeah) or a screenwriting thing with and someone steals something at you, you don’t exactly always get to just go eff off, whatever (Maggie: Yeah) you might have to like, just ignore that that happened to you. So it’s good to have that ability to put those protectors up. But we also be able to take them down.

Maggie Daniels
Yes, yes. And the key to that is, I feel like in a way you you find your inner child voice, you protect them, you let them know that they’re safe with you. And then you show them that they don’t have to be afraid anymore. And I (Lesley: Yeah) feel like that’s a process of delayering all of that. (Lesley: Yeah) And I’m not sure where I am on that process. (Lesley laughs) But I have found so much relief with writing, especially with my film once I got done with the first draft, I really felt like things I’ve been holding on for years I just placed on the characters like they have to carry that shit. Now it’s not mine. And it, ah I can’t even describe it. It’s just such a relief.

Lesley Logan
So I find this really fascinating. So okay, first of all, because I lived in LA and so I was around people who everybody’s writer, everybody’s director, ever… And I I would love to hear your how you got into doing that. Because that is also like, that’s there’s like 1000 stories that people tell themselves every day in Hollywood. And they actually have the access and the means and the agents and like, “I don’t know where you live right now.” But like how how did you get about to writing, writing this film, and then getting it put together and where it is now?

Maggie Daniels
Well, honestly, it was, it’s been a long time coming. I’ve been working on it for about 10 years, because for so many of those years, I had that voice blocking me. And I it’s like Donnie Darko, if you haven’t seen it, there’s this like thing that comes out of his chest, and he follows it. And that’s how I feel with writing. I’m just being pulled from my chest. And I feel like there’s so much pressure, if I don’t write, I’m gonna burst. And that’s really what motivated me to really keep the interest and really like work through the hard… the hardness of it. And once I sat down and really wrote the script, when I knew what I was doing, I had to sign up for a writing class because I was really insecure. I looked up the formatting, but I didn’t know if like I had it right. And I booked a class with the writer, Diane Bell, and she changed my life. And it was the first time that someone came up to me and was like, “You get it. This is good. Like this is better than good. Like, this is something.” And so I don’t know having that outside voice and growing up being like emotionally abused. I’ve never had those like compliments. So it was like hard to process at the time. But it’s it’s really changed my life and the whole like the rest is noise that she always reminds me of it really is. I’ve I’ve had some highs and lows on this project, but it just keeps getting better. (Lesley: Yeah) And if you just keep moving forward. I like to think of it. It’s an old old Christmas movie cartoon about Santa Claus that they play on ABC Family every year, I forget the name of it. But it might be Kris Kringle, but he has a song with the Father Ice. And it’s one foot in front of the other. And if you just put one foot in front of the other, soon, you’ll be walking across the floor, you put one foot in front of the other soon, you’ll be out the door. And I feel that plays out in life, if you just keep going, you’ll get to your destination.

Lesley Logan
Oh my gosh, this is amazing. I feel like I’m like, so grateful for this conversation right now. Because you know, when you’re in the middle, when you know all these things, like you know, all these things, I mean I know it. I know you have one foot, but sometimes you like get stuck. You just get stuck (Maggie: You do.) in your own head, (Maggie: You do.) you tell yourself a story and you’re just like stuck in your own head. And like the story I’m telling myself right now is like, there’s just like, we’re not, we don’t have enough time. (Maggie: Yeah, yeah.) And I, this is a story I’ll that will come up, like, pretty much every other year. And it becomes like the thing. And it’s such an interesting thing. Because I think a lot of people who are listening this will blame themselves because they should know better. (Maggie: Yeah) They like … (Maggie: I feel that way sometimes too.) “I should know better. I tell my clients this. I tell my, I tell my kids, this. I, all these things,” we read the books, (Maggie: Yeah) and but you, you know, we’re not perfect people you (Maggie: No) cannot like and sometimes that voice that you thought you turned down found a way to like, untie hands (Maggie: tic tac) and it goes ‘tick, tick, tick.’ Let me, if I just do it a little bit at a time, they won’t notice, they won’t (Maggie: Yeah) notice the volume going up. And you know, I think it’s um, it’s so important to just remember that you are going to get in your own way. And it’s so important that when when someone comes into your life in a moment to just say that one thing or there’s a song playing like, like, it’s, it’s happening to help get you out of it. And if we just pay attention a little bit, we can go, “Oh,” and then be forgiving, that we may be took a little longer to (Maggie: Yeah) remember that.

Maggie Daniels
Yeah. I’m slowly learning that the word ‘no’ is not scary. It’s not scary. Every ‘no’ leads to a better yes. (Lesley: Yeah.) You just have to get through it. And if if you find it hard to motivate yourself, find a community. (Lesley: Yeah) Even if it’s just one person where you’re like, “Hey, my weekly checkup. How’s it going?” (Lesley: Yeah.) You it’s really about community. And it’s the whole who you know, not what you know, really in life who you know, really changes the game. (Lesley: Well you …) For creativity or anything.

Lesley Logan
I have to I want to go back to the fact that you like signed up for a class because I think (Maggie: Yeah) this is really key. I really like (Maggie: finding people) finding people. So here’s the thing, I just interviewed this guy who John Molluro, Mollura. And he was a rocket scientist, who is a photographer, and he is now like he like he has been for many, many years, full time photographer, like, that’s his thing, right? (Maggie: Yeah) That’s how he pays his bills. And I had asked him, I said, well, like how, like, give me some like, “What your BE IT action item?” and he said, “You have to invest in your idea.” (Maggie: Yeah) Like you have to hire someone. And that … (Maggie: … doing) Yeah, and that’s where people get stuck. Because they’ll tell themselves, “I don’t have the money … I don’t have this or (Maggie: Yeah) this is why should I spend money on this as just a writing class.” (Maggie: Yeah) Like people will say that as opposed to like, it’s, you know, not something that like makes sense. But (Maggie: Yeah) if you invest in an idea that you have. You like first of all, you get someone who had more information than you have, there are few more steps ahead. And you’re literally showing your brain and the universe and the people around you, “This means a lot to me.”

Maggie Daniels
Yeah. I spent my last like $300 on that workshop at the time. I had nothing to my name. And I just went every every week. And it gave me so much life and it’s it’s literally changed my life. And I don’t want to go back to not pursuing my dreams. And the thing is people don’t feel comfortable asking for help, ask for help. No one knows what they’re doing. Everyone use Google for spellcheck like c’mom. Like we’re in an age of it’s so easy to find your community because of access online. Like you can find somebody that matches your energy, that you can communicate with, that’s going to have the answer, you’re looking for. Just pat get get through that discomfort if you’re like shy, intimidated, like everyone’s awkward, you know what I mean? But if you’re just being genuinely yourself, the whole fake it till you make it, is it’s expired. Everyone wants kindness, everyone wants a genuine authenticity. So just be yourself and ask for help.

Lesley Logan
Yeah … yeah, well and I read the the book – Rejection Proof this year and Oh, Maggie put it on your book list. I mean, like you mentioned like, ‘no isn’t a bad thing.’ He went on 100 day like rejection journey. And he came up with like creative ways like to get rejected so he can get over his fear of rejection, because that’s what people have the fear. That’s what’s holding them all back. And we and I definitely want to get into your poetry because I think like that right there. Like every time you get up and speak poetry, I feel like it’s like comedians, anyone who does stand up, like you’re just putting yourself up there to be rejected, because not everyone’s going to like what you do anyways. So anyway, but the book he like, did crazy things like he knocked on people’s doors in Texas on a super on like a football Sunday. I was like, “Hey, can I go in your backyard and take a picture of me kicking a ball?” And like, people were like, “Yeah.” You’d be surprised. Like, I had said earlier in the year, I want the specific person on my podcast, if you know, her, helped me out. And then I was just like, “I’m just going to ask her myself.” And she said, (Maggie: Yeah) “Yes.” And I’m interviewing her next week. So like, I think, we pre reject. We like put the rejection there before it’s even even happened before like it can even happen and then we build up this, this event that’s going to happen that even if people actually reject your idea won’t be as bad as you just dream up in your head.

Maggie Daniels
Dude and it always can even lead to something better. Like don’t even if you get rejected by someone don’t burn that it’s not a burn bridge is professionalism. Like it’s not a burn bridge, you can still maybe spark a friendship, like my favorite rejection that I’ve experienced so far. Because I didn’t know what I was doing. I didn’t know it was like, not appropriate till just like send someone your script. (Lesley laughs) I didn’t know that. So I was just sending people my script that I thought vibed with the story. (Lesley: I love you.) Yeah. (Lesley: Love that so much.) Poems and shit. I didn’t know. And so at the time, it was during the pandemic, and the comedian, Byron Bowers was doing like, Zoom meetings. And it’s just like six or seven of us from around the world that met every week. And we all like, had like trauma problems, and we all bonded on trauma and stuff. And one day, he was talking about city life, and it reminded me in my film, so I just sent him the quick dropbox link on Instagram, DM, and he immediately sent me back like a whole lawyer response, like, ‘blah, blah, blah.’ And yeah, totally professional it’s fine. But my heart went into my ass, okay, like I was so just cringe embarrassed. And then my husband was like, “Oh, it’s no big deal. Like, that’s just like what it is. It’s just professionalism.” He just reminded me and I breathed it out took some dabs. I was like, “okay, namaste.” And then the next morning, I just hopped on the group chat, and it wasn’t like one awkward or anything. It was just like, keep pushing. And long term like six few months later. I was in LA, we go on a hike. We ended up becoming really great friends. Like, really awesome, dude. I love comedians now. Comedians are like, my favorite human beings. Comedians and musicians have (Lesley: Yeah) have the best souls, I swear to God. (Lesley Yeah) But yeah, so that experience for me, just makes me not scared of ‘no’ anymore, because now he’s like, I just I appreciate his friendship. Like, you know what I mean?

Lesley Logan
Well, and also like, I think it’s, I think it’s so great that you just showed up because you didn’t make it a thing. And I (Maggie: Yeah) think like, the things are only there because we make things …

Maggie Daniels
Exactly, I made it up in my head. He didn’t have any thought. And you know, like, there was nothing registered.

Lesley Logan
Yeah, he sent you that response. Because probably there like if he reads that. And then somehow he makes a film and you’re like, “Hey, I have that line on my thing.”

Maggie Daniels
I know. I’m … he explained it to me, it’s a thing. It’s a thing. (Lesley: It’s a thing. It’s a whole thing.) I didn’t know.

Lesley Logan
Yeah. And so you know, but like, I love that you shared the story. And I loved how I love how the story has progressed in your life, because it is something we can all remember, you know, (Maggie: Yeah) like, some like, I just think it’s interesting. We, I think anybody listen to this, who has held themselves some whoppers. I think you should go into writing because (Maggie: Yeah) look at what, look at the stories you’ve made up …

Maggie Daniels
And you know what’s crazy? Is S wimming probably wouldn’t have happened if I didn’t keep going to that Zoom meeting. Because we talked about some really deep stuff. And one day he started talking about like, writing writers, and he was just asking, because he knew some of us wrote poetry in the group and wrote whatever, then he knew I was a writer because I embarrassed the shit out myself. And he was asking, you know, like, how many times a day do you write and that was the conversation like, if you like and I said how often I write. He was like, “Oh, that’s pretty. That’s pretty like that’s like, above average.” You know? I was like, “Yeah, I do have a lot sitting around like, I should just like what am I doing? I’m just sleeping on it.” So like, because of that conversation with Byron like that week I got Swimming together and ended up publishing it later in the year. And when we went on that hike in LA, I brought him a copy. And there’s actually a poem I wrote about the Zoom meeting. It’s called Zoom. And Swimming, it’s called the Zoom. But yeah, it’s I haven’t kept showing up and getting that creative input and inspiration from my own community of related minds. (Lesley: Yeah) I don’t think I would be on this interview right now talking about my book.

Lesley Logan
Well, let’s so let’s talk about that. So so Swimming is your book. (Maggie: Yeah) And so and you know, and y’all can get it. We’ll put it in the link in the in the notes below. But how? Okay, so you just started, like, you went to these meetings. (Maggie: Yeah) And he, he told you like, “Oh, you’re writing more than the average person.” (Maggie: Yeah.) And it’s so again, we go back to like, we talked about this a lot in the podcast for those been listening for a long time. We keep talking about surrounding yourself with people, like you have got a community around like you, you put yourself in a creative network, and you showed up. (Maggie: Yeah) And you not only do you get feedback, but you get ideas. (Maggie: Yeah) And so, so not only had had that not happened, you wouldn’t have this book. So what made, what was the process? And like, how, how did you talk yourself into publishing? Because putting it all together, as one thing, (Maggie: Yeah) put it out for the world to read is a whole other thing.

Maggie Daniels
Yeah. Okay. So first, I went to Google, because that’s my best friend. And I Googled, like, “How to Self Publish?” And I didn’t want to do to do Amazon because everything like Amazon to me, it’s just books get lost, I mean, their number one retailer for books, I don’t hate on … I love the Amazon. But I just didn’t …

Lesley Logan
We love Amazon, too. We got stuff on there, too. (Maggie: I just didn’t want …) In case Jeff is listening. Don’t worry, Jeff.

Maggie Daniels
Yeah. I just didn’t want to get lost in the massiveness of it. (Lesley: Yeah) I just wanted it to be a book only thing. So I looked into Barnes & Noble. And Barnes & Noble, if you go through Barnes & Noble Press, you can publish, self publish. And so they (Lesley: I didn’t know this.) the book. Yeah, it’s amazing. They print the book. And they don’t take that much. Like I told my cousin has been an author for many decades. And she only makes a couple cents. And she’s got trilogies, she only makes a couple cents. And I make like almost $4 per book through Barnes & Noble Press.

Lesley Logan
And also, y’all just so you know, when you see like, self publishing is, like, when it first came out, we’re like, “Oh, yourself,” like, it was a thing. But now like, (Maggie: Yeah) a lot of writers are self publishing. Because when you go through a publishing company, there is a lot more input on what you’re writing. (Maggie: Yep.) And you have to sell whatever amount pass your advance before you start getting paid on it. So it’s, anyways, it’s really is like six one way half a dozen other of course, if you get published by a publishing house, you know, obviously, there’s other things (Maggie: Yeah) can happen for you. But we self published, I did it through Amazon. And, you know, we on the we don’t do the Kindle version, that’s where we, so that’s where …

Maggie Daniels
I couldn’t figure out the formatting to save my life.

Lesley Logan
Well. And also like, you I couldn’t price the book at a place that would get me more than 99 cents. And I this was like, I this the actual everything that went into this, my team, myself everything, like I just, I want you to value this book, because I want you to read it. And I do believe that when you pay for things like your class, (Maggie: Yeah) it was like your last $300. I do believe that. Because from my own experience, like (Maggie: Yeah) I paid for college, so you better believe was in fucking every class. (Maggie: Yeah. Yeah.) I was like, “This class is cost me $700. I’m not fucking missing.”) (Maggie: Yeah, exactly.) So I, um, so I just really wanted my book because it’s for for business people to actually be something that they read. (Maggie: Yeah) So we print through Amazon. And then if you want the e-book, you get it through our site. So it’s just just a little bit more under our control. But I think that’s so cool. So (Maggie: Yeah) like, y’all, all she did was go to her best friend Google, ‘how to self publish’, and then did some research. And now you’re, Barnes & Nobles that’s a big fucking deal.

Maggie Daniels
I know. I feel classy as shit everytime I say it. Yeah. But Barnes & Noble and I got picked on. I couldn’t read as a kid. Okay, I learned how to read through reading poetry. It just clicked for my brain. And so to be in Barnes & Noble, it just blows my mind.

Lesley Logan
Can we talk about that? Because you were were dyslexic. Correct? (Maggie: Yes. Yeah.) Yeah. And so that again, just another story we can tell ourselves about reading and writing. And you are a script writer, a film writer, and you have a book and and tell me, so what about poetry? Because like, that is that one I think is the most the writing genre that most people are misunderstood about what poetry actually is. And I think more people can be poets than we think.

Maggie Daniels
Oh, man, the thing I love about poetry is there are no rules. And I think that’s what drove, well, I didn’t get go to college. I’m sure there are rules. I follow up poets that are in college on Twitter and don’t know what the fuck they’re talking about. So sorry in advance. (Lesley laughs) But to me growing up, I got the impression that there are no rules and poetry. And I used to get in arguments with English teachers, because I would get pop quizzes during Poetry Month. And they’d be like, “How is this line supposed to make you feel?” And I’m like, “You can’t fucking do that.” You can’t like you can’t, you know there’s no correct answer in that. (Lesley: Right) It’s gonna make you feel how it makes you feel. And it’s already done it’s work for the writer. So don’t worry about how the writer wanted it to be. It’s done (Lesley: Yeah) its work for them. It’s all about how it makes you feel in the moment. And I would get really heated about that. But poetry just it clicks for my brain. My mom was really passionate about tutoring me after school and I had tutors during school. Hated it at the time, I would come home and be like, “It’s killing me.” Yeah, that was really dramatic.

Lesley Logan
Yeah, that’s hard. Oh, that has to be hard. I mean, like, nowadays, if you have if you’re dyslexic, there’s like the schools are ready for it. But I don’t know (Maggie: Yeah) how old you are. I feel like we’re about the same age and like, my uncle was dyslexic. He’s a doctor. Right. (Maggie: Yeah) But like, he really struggled because no, people just thought he was like he couldn’t read.

Maggie Daniels
Yeah, they just want to put you in on the short bus.

Lesley Logan
Yeah. They’re like, “Oh, there’s something wrong with this kid. He can’t read.” It’s like, “No, he can’t… He’s dyslexic.”

Maggie Daniels
Yeah, I just can’t read it at the level there reading at, it’s fine. And then I learn all this stuff. And then you grow up. And then professional businesses are spelling shit wrong. I’m like, “What was this even for?”

Lesley Logan
I know. I do whenever I see an error. And I think I was reading one of Oprah’s recent books. And there I’ve read the sentence three times. I’m like, “That was the wrong word. That there’s something wrong with this word, like it’s missing an R or something’s (Maggie: Yeah) wrong here.” And I was like, and I laughed so hard. I was like, I am, you know, like, obviously, you don’t want to have the, like, you could put the wrong word with the wrong meeting. So you (Maggie: Yeah) definitely have the right meaning in there. But you can also spell word wrong, and it’s gonna be okay. Because people’s brains are just scanning anyways.

Maggie Daniels
So, you know, I went over with a toothpick, my book Swimming so many times, but there’s still one misspelled word and it eats me alive. I won’t say it … But that’s my bad.

Lesley Logan
You know, maybe, but it’s also a part of the poet, poetry of it, right? It’s part of the creativity of it.

Maggie Daniels
Yeah, whenever I send my script for edits to my producer, he’s like, “So many edits and my …”

Lesley Logan
Well, we had another writer on and she said, was worried about grammar (Maggie: Ah fuck them, fuck grammer.) And somebody said, somebody said, there’s but that’s why there’s writers and there’s editors.

Maggie Daniels
Editors. Yeah. That’s not my department.

Lesley Logan
Yeah, just like, you know, so oh, my goodness, Maggie, you are really awesome. I mean, you know that but I really, I really do love this authenticity that you you bring up and I think I’ve even if somebody listen to this is not a writer doesn’t want to be a writer, like you can relate so much to your story, which is like, we all have had times in our life where we didn’t think we’re good enough. And we all need people to remind us that what we have is good. (Maggie: Yeah) And it’s and it needs to be out there. And I’m just so grateful for the angels that were put into your life to make sure that you did this so that you could share your story with our listeners today. Because they need to hear you, they need to hear this.

Maggie Daniels
Definitely, definitely makes you feel a little less alone in the world when someone says something that makes sense to you.

Lesley Logan
Yeah, well, we’re gonna take a quick little break and then we’re gonna find out how people can find you, follow you and read all of your work.

All right, Maggie, where do you hang out? Are you on the socials? Where can people get to read more of your work in here and what are you up to?

Maggie Daniels
maggielogic.com has all the links to my socials. Instagram is at @maggielogic, and you can buy Swimming at barnesandnoble.com. I’m currently sold out on maggielogic.com. I gotta order some more books. (Lesley: Yeah) But you can also check out the really awesome audio book on all music streaming services, Spotify, iTunes, YouTube, Amazon Music, all of them. It’s really awesome. I teamed up with the composers Corey Campbell and Jenna Desmond out of Charleston, South Carolina and Mike Henderson and out of Colorado for recording studio. And it’s masterpiece. I’m reading it and my my friends joke with me. They’re like, “Who’d you, who’d you get to read your book.” And I was like, “Me, I say it that in the beginning. And it’s me.” (Lesley laughs) I was in character. And that was the first time I read the book from cover to cover. And it was it was it was it took its toll. I did take some breaks. It was emotional. So shout out to voice … voice-over artists. It’s a lot.

Lesley Logan
Yeah, that’s that’s a skill that I think a lot of be like, “Oh, I should like I should be a voice-over person.” Like …

Maggie Daniels
It takes a lot out of you. It really does. (Lesley: Yeah) It really does. (Lesley: Yeah) It was fun. It was fun. It was fun.

Lesley Logan
I hope that you do more work. I hope that you, I hope this is first of many, and (Maggie: Oh yeah. I got two more books coming out.) Ah, okay, keep us posted on that. (Maggie: Will do.) I definitely, I’m really excited about what you’re doing. Okay. So before we let you go, BE IT action items, bold, executable, intrinsic or targeted steps people can take to be it till they see it. What do you have?

Maggie Daniels
Definitely, number one, find your people because when you have your low days, you need that extra motivation and always show up for them and they’ll show up for you. And number two, I would microdose your tasks. So just like working out 10 or 20 sounds a lot but you can do five and five sounds a lot, you can do four. So like just a couple minutes a notepad if you’d like to write or I just sometimes just write notes on my phone, you always have your phone on you. If that’s your genre, you know if you want to write but yeah, just microdose your task.

Lesley Logan
I like that. I like that a lot. Okay, Maggie, you’re amazing. Thank you for being here and thank you for sharing your story and all that you’re up to. I’m leaving very inspired. I hope everyone listening is, well how are you going to use these tips in your life. Tag @maggielogic, tag the @be_it_pod. Let us know and please share this podcast with someone. If you don’t know how to share it on the on the gram, I get it like not everyone’s a professional, social media person then text it, screenshot it, send it however you can because not only does it help our our guests out, it helps the podcasts up but most importantly helps all of the people in your life out. You know if everybody is getting this powerful inspiration dose each day, then the world is a much better place. So until next time everyone, Be It Till You See It.

Lesley Logan
That’s all I’ve got for this episode of the Be It Till You See It podcast! One thing that would help both myself and future listeners is for you to rate this show and leave a review. And, follow or subscribe for free wherever you listen to podcasts. Also, make sure to introduce yourself over at the @be_it_pod on Instagram! I would love to know more about you. Share this episode with whoever you think needs to hear it. Help us help others to BE IT TILL YOU SEE IT. Have an awesome day!

Lesley Logan
‘Be It Till You See It’ is a production of ‘As The Crows Fly Media’.

Brad Crowell
It’s written, produced, filmed and recorded by your host, Lesley Logan and me, Brad Crowell. Our Associate Producer is Amanda Frattarelli.

Lesley Logan
Kevin Perez at Disenyo handles all of our audio editing.

Brad Crowell
Our theme music is by Ali at APEX Production Music. And our branding by designer and artist, Gianfranco Cioffi.

Lesley Logan
Special thanks to our designer Jaira Mandal for creating all of our visuals (which you can’t see because this is a podcast) and our digital producer, Jay Pedroso for editing all video each week so you can.

Brad Crowell
And to Angelina Herico for transcribing each of our episodes so you can find them on our website. And, finally to Meridith Crowell for keeping us all on point and on time.

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