How to Create Confidence and Changes in the World

Ep. 7 ft. Alex Street

“Stories change the world, when you cheer, when you share your story, it will actually change those that hear it.”

Alex Street

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Bio

Alex is a Storytelling Coach, helping you share your story and connect with your audience. He has been a Youth Worker, Actor, and Public Speaker for two decades. His specialized blend of storytelling, captivating content, and a powerful performance has set him apart as a speaker and coach for audiences of all kinds. Alex is the host of the Fearless Speakers Academy and the Make Speaking Magical video course. He has a Masters in Theological Studies, lives near Toronto, Ontario as a husband of 15 years, and he’s dad to three Gen Z kids.

Show Notes

Alex Street bares all about making his transition from an accomplished youth pastor to a speaking coach, wrestling with validation, bravery, self-belief, merging two worlds… Then Alex tells Lesley his awesome B.E.I.T action item of going out and finding a coach who has been where you want to go, and how to create confidence even when you don’t have it yet. If you have any questions about this episode or want to get some of the resources we mentioned, head over to LesleyLogan.co/podcast. If you have any comments or questions about the Be It pod shoot us a message at [email protected] as always, if you’re enjoying the show please share it with someone who you think would enjoy it as well. It is your continued support that will help us continue to help others. Thank you so much! Never miss another show by subscribing at LesleyLogan.co/subscribe.

In this episode you will learn about:

  • Taking the leap
  • Merging your work and your life
  • Facing fears about sharing why you are an expert
  • How to create confidence even when you don’t have it yet

References/Links:

  • Instagram: @streetsays
  • Website: https://alexstreet.ca
Transcript

EPISODE:

Welcome to the Be It Till You See It podcast where we talk about taking messy action, knowing that perfect is boring. I’m Lesley Logan, Pilates instructor and fitness business coach. I’ve trained thousands of people around the world and the number one thing I see stopping people from achieving anything is self doubt. My friends, action brings clarity and it’s the antidote to fear. Each week, my guests will bring Bold, Executable, Intrinsic and Targeted steps that you can use to out yourself first and Be It Till You See It. It’s a practice, not a perfect. Let’s get started.

Lesley Logan 0:01
Okay, okay. Hello, everyone. Hello, my dear friend Alex Street, I’m so excited that you’re here. I’m really excited to get to spend this morning together, you are one of my favorite humans on this planet. And when I was creating this podcast, I wanted to make sure that you were on it specifically because your story is so inspirational. But you don’t just have one story that’s inspirational. There’s like many parts of you and facets to you that I want to share with everyone. And so I want to let you introduce yourself to the listeners and the viewers here. So Alex, take it away.

Alex Street 0:35
So good, Lesley, I am thrilled to be a part of this. It is such a joy to be invited in here. And yeah, such a pleasure, we’re gonna have some fun. So I’m in. I’m in Toronto, Canada, and I am a storytelling coach. I really help people uncover their story and share it with confidence. And what I’m finding is, this is something that I have been doing all along. And something that I’m more recently really embracing as, this is what I bring to the table. Like, this is the thing, this is what I’m here to do. And I mean, I’m really doing that I’m finding that as I uncover my own story. So this is all part of the journey for me, I’m only taking people where I’ve already been I’m taking people on the same transformation that I’ve been on from powerless to confident. And as I do that, it’s an absolute wild ride and I’m loving it right now. So, story all the way all through and through in my family with me with my kids, now. It’s all about story and how to get your story out to the world. That’s what I’m here for.

Lesley Logan 1:49
I love this. Okay, so there’s a couple things that that stuck out with me there. Aside from that you are a father with kids, and I’m sure that there’s a there’s an element of pressure that comes with being a parent that you want to make sure that they live a life that has the lessons you’ve learned imparted onto them, right, like

Alex Street 2:08
Yeah, a little bit.

Lesley Logan 2:11
That’s why, that’s why I have dogs.

Alex Street 2:16
Good.

Lesley Logan 2:17
Um, I, I love that you you just said in this that you have discovered that story is your thing all along. And I wonder what led what was the what was the… I don’t know, the discovery of the gem. Like when did this come upon you that you’re like, oh, story is my thing.

Alex Street 2:35
Yeah, it’s it’s just rooting down is doing the work. It’s having the bravery. I think that’s all that it was was over the last really 18 months, I would say I got brave enough to go deeper and deeper and deeper into who I am. And and to go to the roots of my journey. I think for probably 15 years, I was staying pretty surface, like up top doing good work and doing all kinds of things. But any questions that I had about what I’m supposed to do in this world was all about how I’m supposed to show up. You know what I mean? Like, how do I do the thing that I feel led to do, but I hadn’t really done the work to discover, well, what is that thing – like what is deep down at the core, the very center of it all. What’s driving me forward? So as I did that work, then I kind of you break through the surface, and you break through the surface of just how I’m showing up or what I’m doing. And you really get to that why and for me, storytelling, performing… that’s been there, all along, right from the start. And so then that becomes a through line. And I just see so clearly how that is, that’s, I mean, it’s very much even in my blood, I would say.

Lesley Logan 3:51
Okay, so you said brave, and I this is something resonates because I believe in being bold. And I think that the being brave part, the being bold part, is where people get stuck. And I also mean that you just like, because it’s hard to have confidence or feel brave or feel bold and something you haven’t done before. And you and I met at a mastermind, which, you know, six months before that I actually didn’t know what a mastermind was.

Alex Street 4:15
Samesies! I’m with ya!

Lesley Logan 4:21
But I just I was in a place in my life probably similar to you. Where I was, I was very good at not being less like overconfident, like, like blabbing about myself but like I was really good at what I did. However, there was this thing inside me that just felt like there I was meant to do more and I wasn’t stepping into that. And I think a lot of people it whether it’s your job or a relationship, a friendship a goal, you have something that you want to do you know the thing that you’re supposed to be stepping into and you might not have it completely – like with full clarity – but you know what, that is and it, there’s, it tugs at you and it causes it like it keeps me up at night and I was like What is this thing? I joined a mastermind hoping to figure out like, what was my next thing? Because I hadn’t seen it. Right. So it’s really hard to want something you haven’t seen before. And so when you when you were becoming brave to do the thing… What… What was the… what made you feel okay to be brave?

Alex Street 5:20
Yeah. It’s so good. I mean, it’s just so like you’re tapping into everybody’s like, “yeah, I get that. I feel that, oh, she’s saying exactly how I feel.” Because that’s it, like most of the clients that I work with now are coming to me in that sort of a space saying, like, I know that there’s something or I’m just, there’s something here, but I’m not saying it right. I don’t I can’t get the messaging, right. I don’t know. It feels like I have two different stories, like I’m living two different stories. And all that it is, is, again, you’re just up on this surface of like, like you did coming in saying, “?How do I get the answer? How do I do this thing better?” Or, “How do I do this thing more efficiently?” And so how did I get to the place of finding that bravery? Oh, man, many years of questioning, of doubting of, of leaving opportunities, of rejecting opportunities, of jumping into the unknown. Cue the Elsa music, really just expanding and saying, I wonder what else is there…

I mean, if we want to go right back, like I can take you into the story and the journey of like, you know, how I got to here. And we can go there if you want. Yeah. Because this is where, right? This is the relatable part of the story. Again, you can look at the last three years and be like, okay, who am I based on these years? And I would say, no, no, no, look at what you want to do now. And then say, Where did that begin? And so for you, if it’s like, I want to affect people, I want to help people build their businesses and you go like, Alright, where did that begin for you – like that helpfulness, that entrepreneurial spirit, like, were you making lemonade stands were what was this all about? For you? And for me, I want to help people perform. I want to help people tell their story with confidence. And that then deals with speaking in performance, all kinds of stuff. And for me that begins, like second grade, when my mom who’s an actress, put me on stage. She like she came into the school and directed a pantomime, which is like a kind of production that’s just total silliness, right? And it was Cinderella. My brother was one of the ugly stepsisters, like it was just bonkers. Which I’m so glad that he was because we can still make fun of him. So he was that, and my mom created this scene with a teddy bears picnic, just so that I could be in the in the show and dress up like a teddy bear and play badminton. But something caught on to me there, like, that was it. I was like, “This is fun.” Whatever this is, I’d second grade. I’m like I caught the bug. And my mom hadn’t performed for a long time. But then she got back on the stage. And I then grew up like as a young teen and teenager, I was backstage like I went to the theater with her, I would see you know, she was in a production that would have a run of maybe 30 shows. And I was there for like 13/15 of them. And so I would watch the show sometimes. But then sometimes I would actually just sit backstage as quiet as a mouse and do my crosswords or something and watch the whole show happen behind the scenes. And I was just I didn’t know it then, right? But it was further enhancing, developing, growing this, like this thing that was planted inside me. That was this love for the whole thing. How people show up, how they perform what story we’re telling, how to tell the story well, and it just grew and grew and grew to the point where I’m like, I’m gonna be an actor. No, no, like, I’m gonna, you know, I’m gonna get an Oscar. I had the speech written for my 21st it was before I was 21. That was my goal. I’m gonna win an Oscar.

Lesley Logan 8:56
Oh, my God, I love this so much.

Alex Street 8:57
Sadly the speech has been thrown out. But

Lesley Logan 9:01
So so. Okay, I… this brings you so many thoughts. Because I think when you’re listening to someone tell a story. And you see, you see the results of where you are, I am or anyone else in their life, like you see the fruits of the labor, but you don’t see how far back the labor went. And I think a lot of people forget that their childhood was filled with so many experiences that set them up for today. And I was in theater for a while growing up and so I can picture I can picture this the the setting that you’re taught, you’re describing, and you’re basically growing up seeing how performance, speaker, story changes people affects people. And so of course, this is something that you want to do and now and now you are teaching people how to tell their story which is beyond because I think some people listening like I don’t even know how to describe my story. I put it together. I’ve been blessed to hear how you do that. And I and it’s just so freakin amazing. So, if you’re, if you’re wanting to have help with that, this is your man. But I do wonder, you know, when you – there’s a point between like, you want to be an actor, you want to have an Oscar, and now you’re a story, coach. Yeah, the space between that… Where like… Can you take us a little bit into that? Because I think that is a journey where people might, you might have thought, well, I like wandered over here, and I wandered over here. But all of those are like pieces to the puzzle that made you who you are. So can you just share like a little brief part of that tour?

Alex Street 10:34
Yeah, absolutely. Like this is, and this is the thing, this is where it gets into the how – how you do it is kind of actually, in the grand scheme of things, irrelevant. But that the beauty is like that I was trying to do the same thing the whole time, which was not only tell my story, but help other people tell their story. And so I, you know, I tried to be an actor move downtown Toronto, and then took a left turn and went into youth ministry, and became a youth pastor. You know, as you do if you want to be an actor? No, I don’t think so, that’s not the route. So you jumped, I jumped into this. And, and of course, like, there’s parts of me that at the time, were saying, of course I did. Because I get to get up every week in front of a group of people that are unforgiving, and yet wildly forgiving – young teens – who like they won’t give you an inch as a speaker, and yet, show up, show that you care. And they’re here to hang out. And they know that you love them. Like that’s all that matters to them. So I had weekly opportunities to practice my craft, to practice telling a story that is 1000s of years old, in new and fresh ways. That is the Bible and the story of Jesus and all this and trying to put on characters, whatever I can do to capture the attention of a freaking 12 year old. It was this incredible challenge of performance of storytelling. And then, I mean, forget the stage element, I just actually get to hang out with teenagers and families and help pull out what I see in them, that other people don’t. And I just got to see, Wow, you really have a gift for leadership. Well, you ever really have a gift for stories, you really have a gift for making others feel safe. What if you started to use that? And then start to pull those gifts out of them? So there’s this journey that Yeah, I’m youth pastor, and it’s weird. And does that feel separated? I don’t know. But ultimately, it was this further journey. Again, just doing the thing that I’ve always been here to do, which is to tell stories, and show up with confidence helping other people tell their stories as well.

Lesley Logan 12:42
Oh, this is so great, because I think so many people, I get this question a lot. If you for those who don’t know me, I also coach people in the fitness business. But I get this question a lot. Like, “What are people going to think if I just announced that I am this instructor now?” And I’m like,

Alex Street 12:57
Yeah,

Lesley Logan 12:58
They’re gonna be really excited for you. Right? But like, you know, that feeling because I’m sure when you when you left, being a youth pastor, and then you decided to be a story coach, like, did you have that feeling like, “What are people gonna think when I say I’m this now?”

Alex Street 13:13
Yeah, that was a big moment. That was Yeah, one of my, you know, hinge moments, everything that I’ve told you so far is kind of the in-who-I-was category. And then there’s this moment where it was jumping into that mastermind. But a couple years ago, where I was trying to figure out what am I supposed to do? I know I’m supposed to speak, I’m not a youth pastor anymore. I left that about five or six years ago, realizing I’m not in that box anymore. And yet, there’s still something that I’m here to do. I’m here to speak in some way. And, and I saw this opportunity to help, you know, to either speak with organizations or help those running organizations perform better perform in a higher level. But what if, what if I talk about that? What if I show up like that, and I start saying, Hey, I’m leaving the ministry space and going into this space. And still, I’m still have gigs at that point, like speaking at retreats at events with hundreds of teenagers still have, I’m still being invited into these things. What if I start to say, I’m going over here. And then to think about going into the mat to that mastermind. Like, that was the thing I took the jump, I made that leap. And that’s all kinds of different things all in there. But then I remember standing up in front of the group with a microphone. I was the first one to introduce myself. And the only thing that I was thinking was like, Okay, how do I talk about my business? That’s one thing. But the thing that was most of my mind, I have 90 seconds to say who I am. And the thing was not not “say this” in my head was “don’t say youth pastor, don’t say youth pastor, don’t say youth pastor” because I was thinking these people in this space, entrepreneurship, business, whatever it is, they’re not going to respect that my entire resume. was with snot nose, teenagers. Are you… like, like, what good is that? What, that… So I was terrified to talk about where I’d been to one group. And I was terrified to talk about where I was going to the other group thinking that they would lose their influence and their respect caught in this in between space. And that, I think, is where a lot of people as you were just alluding to find themselves, “Now, how do I move forward into a new space,” leaving that behind and stepping into something unknown? It’s a terrifying place to be. I’ll just be honest,

Lesley Logan 15:37
We’re definitely going to come back to this because I want to know, like, it was what was their announcement or not, maybe there wasn’t but right. I was in that room, y’all. And Alex was the first person to go and I My name is Lesley Logan. So I’m always in the middle of everything, right. And so I’m so grateful. I was like, thank God, I’m go first, like, but it’s so funny. The stories we tell ourselves, because I remember thinking like this. I mean, like, you’re listening to different people in all walks of life, talk about basically bragging, you’re allowed to brag for 90 seconds. That’s like literally what you’re told to do. And I was raised, like, Don’t brag, it’s, like, unattractive. And so like, having to overcome the thoughts of like, it’s okay to brag, because I don’t want it but I was like, I’m a Pilates instructor like, who in here is gonna be like, Oh, yeah, that girl, that’s the girl who’s gonna help me. You know, it’s just so funny. Like the stories we tell ourselves about all the people in a room. And actually, and it’s so funny, because I would, I would never let anyone in the room I was talking to ever let themselves think that way about who they are and what they do, but we get in these spaces. And so and so, you know, I remember when I was like, Okay, and now I’m gonna announce that I’m a business coach supplies instructors, I’m I’m thinking people are going to be like, what you’ve been teaching for two years, girl like, no way, like, Who are you to do this. And I got to a place where I was so frustrated with not making the change that I needed to see that I just like, announced it. And I’m one of those people who’s like, kind of like, will announce things. And I’m, like, run off and just see what happens later. Like, did it catch on fire? Like, how are we doing? But I would love to, I would love to hear like, you know, you’re in this space of like, I’m not telling this group. Like what I’m doing now, I’m not telling this group what I was doing. When did you tell all the groups what they needed to hear?

Alex Street 17:34
Yeah, so let’s say I mean, just put a timeline to it. That was September, I think 2019. When even just signing up for that mastermind was me “being it,” right, “being it till I see it.” That’s that that was it. I was like, Alright, well, I’m going for it. Here we go. I don’t know what this is. All I know is that I can’t take my business, whatever this is to the next level to any level without somebody guiding me along the way. Let’s get into a room with 50 other people and see what happens. But you step in that space, everybody looks perfect. I don’t belong there. All these thoughts through my head. Don’t say your youth pastor, nobody will respect that. Just go up and talk about what you do. And then get the facts and get out of there. That’s what was going on my head, Mr. Confidence, Mr. Like guy who has shown up in every room that he stepped into in a ministry setting, and is the one leading the way, essentially, and now I show up in this setting in this new group with these new people. And I’m going in thinking, like, I’m going to be the one who, who brings something today, I’m going to be the one who helps people today. And immediately, I felt so small. And so that smallness is what I said, when I get up to the microphone, I said that I share my intro eventually I did say yeah, so my business is Gen Z matters. It’s helping organizations work with the next generation. And I remember pausing and then filling the gap with I’m an expert in this because I’ve been a youth pastor for 15 years, and my mouth kept going, but my foot was kicking myself. So Oh, man, I was so frustrated with myself at that point. But the cat was out of the bag. That was it. It just sort of happened. And what came after that is what was important, because then I sat down, people were like, Great, good job, good to meet you all that stuff. I think it was the next session. Actually, you and I were at the same table together. And you said something to me, Lesley, that I still have in my notebook. You said, You are a badass when you got up there and grab that mic. You knew your shit. We could see that. You had so much passion. We need more of it. And so I took that when Whoa. So all these gifts that I thought were only valuable of speaking of all these things that I had not been affirmed of yet were immediately being affirmed in this new environment. And that sparked something else inside me that like re-lit this flame to say, holy crap, this is possible. And then later that night, I had dinner with some people and they said, you realize that your story, you being a youth worker for 15 years, that is your superpower, you’ve had weekly speaking experiences, speaking opportunities. There’s worldwide keynote speakers that haven’t spoken to a crowd as many times as you have Alex, you got to lead with that. And so that’s that started to open me up and go, holy crap. Okay. So whatever doubts I had about sharing with this new group, were very quickly extinguished. Because it was the right group, because they’re nice people, and most people will respond that way. That’s what I’m finding. Do you know what I mean?

Lesley Logan 20:51
No, I Oh, my God, I do know what you mean. I want to just like, go back for a second. First of all, y’all can’t see this. If you’re on listening to the podcast, but like, I, I didn’t know what I was telling you would be that, that pivotal in your life, y’all. I’m ………………… Anyways, um, but so if you’re listening to this know that like, when you are out, if there is something on your heart, say it to someone, because it might be the exact thing that they need to hear, to take that next step to take that next brave step. And so thank you for sharing that with me. Because I made a commitment to myself a few years back that like I was going to tell people, the thing that was on my mind about them in person in the moment if I could, because you, it’s hard to get that moment back. So I wanted to do that. And I’m so glad I did. You don’t even you know, I can’t even tell you if it was like, I just knew I had to tell you that. And so I’m so glad you heard it. That’s also really awesome. But, you really, you said – it be until you see it, you enter the room that is so bold, you enter a room of 50 people. And you didn’t feel like you’re ready to be there. You’re this intrinsic motivation of like, trying to figure out what’s next what your next step is right executable, like showing up. And then like the steps you took to act like the what you learn, you made some steps that you could do, and like you had this target audience that you were working towards, which I really liked. So all these words can represent different things for different people. But you really, you really that whole moment was an absolute Be it till you see it moment. And I love that it was like this little you said/called it a hinge like was hopefully or maybe it was the thing that puts you on the other side, you can go back to Toronto and go, yeah, y’all. This is what I’m doing now. And this is why I’m so good at it.

Alex Street 22:36
So that Yeah, exactly. So that was like, you know, that’s one half of that sort of change. And then the other one was yes, then that gave me the boldness to come back. And I was hosting a podcast at that point called made for this. And it was just it was helping people tell their stories and do and discover what you’re made for. And I was like, I feel like I’m not even sharing my story of doing what I made for. So here’s the here’s the chance. And I just turn on the microphone. And it was the most unscripted yet kind of scripted. Like I you know, I had my points, but I just said, I’m just gonna go for this and speak from the heart, and let it go and and told that journey. And that was, that was a faith journey. That was a career journey that was a family journey. Like I felt like there was so much in that to essentially come clean to, you know, families, people that I’ve influenced, and had, and inspired and had incredible memories with for 15 years that I was like saying, “Hey, this is like, this is what was going on.” And it was just a movement away from kind of what I’ve always believed or what I had believed at that point. And here’s the shift, and here’s why I think you can too. And here’s what to do when you’re not who you are. And that was the point of it all. And so then as soon as I mean, I recorded it. And that’s one thing. Anybody can go and record something and speak into a microphone with nobody in the room. Hitting publish on that baby. That was when my hands were shaking. That was when you know, I’m staring out the window questioning everything. Is this a mistake? Why did I do this about to hit delete, and hit published and they’re publish and there’s freedom? That’s it. absolute freedom to just go, “Who cares?” Like I mean, what what was I so worried about? And then here’s the key, this whole journey of me being afraid to share that story, because what are they going to think? Or what are they gonna think? Well, again, we had that one experience where let’s say you and I sit there and my doubt was that you would respect me and you actually showed up and said, holy crap, you’ve got something special here. And then when I release that, and I’m afraid that they’re going to not respect me, the only people that came forward, nobody came forward and said, “What? How terrible! This is awful.” Everybody came forward and said, Thank you can we can we set up a call because I’m going through the same experience. Or, thank you for sharing this. It’s exactly what I’ve been going through. And I was afraid to tell anybody. And that just reinforced further solidified this belief that I have that drives everything that stories change the world, when you cheer, when you share your story, it will actually change those that hear it. And that’s, that belief is what drives me forward. And if we all believe that, then we’ll find the confidence, we need to share what we’ve got.

Lesley Logan 25:27
Oh, I’m in love with this because I do. So, because I resonate so much with this whole idea of like, you have to hit publish, and you’re like, Oh, my God, this is it. Like this is when it’s going to go out and like what, like, what have you and it’s so funny, because I think, you know, I’m really grateful. My husband when I, because I do share, I’m like, this is what I’m afraid of. Because it’s easier if you just like put it out there. Like all of a sudden, a lot of the fear is like, it sounds so silly. When you say it out loud. Sometimes you’re like, really?

Like, that’s so weird. But, um, so but I think oftentimes, we don’t actually acknowledge what that fear is like, what is the fear that is going to happen? And we just, we have it in our head, but we don’t actually speak it out loud. And when you speak it out loud, it doesn’t actually give it power actually, I think takes a lot of that fear away because you see it, black and white, like this is it it’s like really? Is that really what’s going to happen. Like you can really have that conversation with yourself. But I love that you didn’t delete it, you did hit publish, and I wonder were you like, check, like refreshing your email or reviews are like, were you like checking to see if people had any responses? Or did you just like, were you like me? Or like publish? Run away!

Alex Street 26:40
Yeah, definitely, there was a sense of, okay, who’s gonna see this, who’s gonna who’s gonna listen, and you know, it’s not it was like, there was 150 listeners per episode, like, this is not a massively published thing this is. But even To that end, it’s mostly people that knew me, I think at that point who were listening to it. So now, anybody that knows this is going to is going to hear the journey. And so there was a little bit of that. But then this letting go, I think what happened when I hit Publish was that was actually me letting go of those expectations. And those, you know, what are they going to say, kind of thoughts and fears. And, and what I realized, even with that is that, so much of this, so much of showing up is about you, it’s actually for you at first, it’s it’s for you to let go of a lot of those fears, it’s for you to let go a lot of a lot of those doubts and self limiting beliefs that you have for yourself that truly nobody else has.

Lesley Logan 27:43
Right…

Alex Street 27:43
People are thinking of you a lot less than you ever think they are, like

Lesley Logan 27:49
So true!

Alex Street 27:50
To zero amount.

Lesley Logan 27:53
It’s so true!

Alex Street 27:54
And so so much of these fears that are holding us back from showing up. It’s not about appeasing anybody that’s out there or helping them see it all, it’s really just about you getting to the point where you actually do have that. You create that confidence that wasn’t there before, to do the thing, so that you can continue to show up, and then it becomes about your audience and really showing up for them. So that’s what it was, for me. It was, I had to do that. I had to do that for me.

Lesley Logan 28:19
Oh, I love that. It’s so true. I want to reiterate like people really don’t talk about you as much as you think that they do. They’re not even thinking about you. And the ones that are that is that they’re not thinking about you… They’re thinking about 17 other people other than themselves. So they’ll just be like, “Oh, did you hear about Alex, he did blah, blah,” and then, “Oh my gosh, but john did this…” and like, like, they’re, they’re not even it’s like in one ear out the other. It’s like not even sticking with them. And so if people are the like, not your people anyways, but um, I do think you said it, like, there’s an action you took and action is the antidote to fear. So, confidence is this interesting thing, that it’s really hard to be confident in an area you haven’t done something before. It’s hard to step in confidently going “I am a stories coach,” if you’ve actually not coached anyone on stories. And I’ve been doing a lot of research on this because people always asking like, Lesley, you’re just so confident. And it’s like, really, I do most things scared at as fuck. Like, seriously, like, including this project of a podcast. But, um, but I, I have I have I know that the more I take action towards the thing that I want, the less the fear has the power, the less like things that are stopping me from doing it and you get so much clarity from that, and you get a lot of like you, you get that boost of confidence that comes from that. And I think, you know, I was talking with my therapist, which I think everyone needs, needs someone like that, about confidence versus self esteem. And she says Lesley, you could have confidence on a snowboard and be not confident on skis. It’s not like it’s not something you have all the time, right? It’s like it, confidence is very much in the moment, and you can have it like you can make it happen. It’s a state of being. But it’s not necessarily like, if you’re not confident in one thing, then you’re not confident. Right. And it’s a difference on like self esteem, which is like, where you where you believe in yourself more than you don’t like as a high self esteem. That’s how I’m thinking of it. And maybe over time, as I research it, it will change. But I feel like the you know, the more people who are listening to this, the more people take action towards the thing that they’re wanting, the less the fear is control. And the more confident you’ll become, because you’ll have done something in that area of what you want. It’s a kind of a cheat in a way.

Alex Street 30:46
Well, right, and so much of fear. And that doubt, like take it to snowboard, and you’re going to be terrified that you can’t do this thing. And it’s a completely made up scenario. And so whether it’s, can I actually make it down the hill and survive without hitting a tree? Well, it’s made up until you have the evidence to see it to know if you can balance on that thing or not. And it’s the same with, if I put this out there, what will people think? If I start talking about myself in this way, what will my old clients think of me? What will the new… will the new clients accept me? Like there’s all these questions that we make up without taking any steps of action? So you’re creating this terribly convoluted and complicated story with it’s a choose-your-own-adventure in your mind, and you’re not actually going down any path and it’s wildly exhausting. Like, no wonder we’re walking around, overwhelmed, tired, distracted, because you have 16 narratives going on in your head about what’s about to happen. Instead of saying, this is I think, where I’m being led, this is consistent with my story. And so I’m going to take this next right step? And we’ll see if it’s the right step. If it’s the right step, or the wrong step, at least it’s a step. And that might just be the most confident thing that we can do today and call, call it confidence. Don’t call it a whim. Don’t call it an accident. Don’t call it. I don’t know. I’m just winging it. No. Yeah, that action, as you say, Lesley, that is it. That’s, that is confidence – to go and do anything today? It’s not to belittle it, but like, that’s it. If you show up. You’re, you’re creating confidence. And I think that’s it, we’re waiting, we expect competence to be the same that you’re born with. And simply not. It’s something that’s created in you. And it has been created as you believe, as you find the boldness, and you learn to bounce back.

Lesley Logan 32:46
Oh, I love this. I love this. It’s you’re not born with confidence. It’s something that… I love that so much. All right. So I’m Alex, I want to make sure that listeners hear a “be it” tip from you. So what is bold or executable, intrinsic or targetable tip that you could give those listening, because I’m sure they’ve resonated with you so much and a tip from you, would, might just be the next first step they should take?

Alex Street 33:14
Yeah, I love it. I think my my tip, my encouragement will be kind of all of those things. And it really is. Get someone to help. That’s, that’s for me. I’ve had friends that have had conversations with me all along. And I adore these people, I have been on the journey with them. And yet, they don’t understand exactly the choices that I want to make, or the world that I want to get into the work that I’m doing. Now. They don’t understand the level of that. And if they do, they can tell me things. They can challenge me in certain ways, but not specifically around, like, what’s my business going to do and what’s my impact going to be? And so I would say you know, the bold, executable, intrinsic and targetable invitation or tip is, I mean, really to nail it down, it’s get a coach, get a coach or get in the room with other people who will be able to coach you who are specifically on this journey that look like the same journey that you’re on. They’re all afraid they’re all taking the next step. They’re all trying to get their business right. They’re all or they understand where you’re at and how to get you into the next one will challenge you ruthlessly and will target in on what your need is, and we’ll help you get there. So that will require boldness, because Holy crap, the money, I don’t know. It’s executable, because well, I got to find someone. And then I got to say yes. And instead of just letting it hang there, the intrinsic drive is alright what? Okay, I know I need to make a change, but it’s not happening on your own. So let’s listen to that intrinsic self sense. That is bringing you to towards community and bringing you towards others and find that help. And then the targetable is, get it done. Do you have a coach or not? If you don’t, then it’s not happening. So I would say that for me, that’s I mean, that’s been my game changer. That’s the way that I’m helping people now and seeing that happen in their life, those that are bold enough to step in and say, help me understand my story.

Lesley Logan 35:24
And you all…

Alex Street 35:24
Turns into, like, change.

Lesley Logan 35:26
Alex have so many, like you help so many people. And so where can they find you? What’s your Instagram handle? What’s the best way people can get in touch?

Alex Street 35:34
Yeah, fantastic. So my website is AlexStreet.ca. You can kind of find all the info there. And then yeah, I hang out on Instagram all the time. So that’s @streetsays,

Lesley Logan 35:45
oh, y’all, if any I know so much probably resonate with you. But do us a favor, screenshot this, share it tag us both. And please put a takeaway, like, what is something that you took away from this, so that Alex, and I can hear what resonated with you and root for you and cheer you on in this way. Like, you’re not alone in this journey. And I’m so grateful for you listening. I’m so grateful for you Alex being here to share your story. I couldn’t think of someone better to bring on the show to actually talk about story and share it. I think I’m so grateful we met and nothing happens by chance. We were meant to be in that room together and many people in that small group together. And I’m really excited to see where you both go from here. Thank you for being here.

Alex Street 36:25
Oh gosh. Lesley, this is so good. It has been such a joy. You’re a fantastic host. Thank you for leading us through this conversation. I’m truly excited for how this will help people.

Lesley Logan

That’s all I’ve got for this episode of the Be It Till You See It podcast!

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Help us help others to BE IT TILL YOU SEE IT. Have an awesome day!

Lesley Logan

‘Be It Till You See It’ is a production of ‘As The Crows Fly Media’.

Brad Crowell

It’s written, produced, filmed and recorded by your host, Lesley Logan and me, Brad Crowell.

Lesley Logan

Kevin and Bel at Disenyo handle all of our audio editing and some social media content.

Brad Crowell

Our theme music is by Ali at APEX Production Music. And our branding by designer and artist, Gianfranco Cioffi.

Lesley Logan

Special thanks to our designer Jaira Mandal for creating all of our visuals (which you can’t see because this is a podcast) and our digital producer, Jay Pedroso for editing all the video each week so you can.

Brad Crowell

And to Meridith Crowell for keeping us all on point and on time.

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